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Monday, November 20, 2017

Noaa Corps News

Lynch Takes Helm of NOAA’s Atlantic Fleet

Anne K. Lynch

NOAA Capt. Anne K. Lynch has assumed command of the agency's Marine Operations Center-Atlantic in Norfolk, Va., which manages the day-to-day operations of the nine research and survey ships in NOAA's Atlantic fleet. Each year these ships conduct dozens of missions to assess fish and marine mammal stocks, conduct coral reef research, collect seafloor data to update nautical charts, and explore the ocean. Lynch relieves NOAA Corps officer Anita Lopez, who has served as the center's commanding officer since June 2012.

Begich, Wicker, Schatz Introduce NOAA Corps Amendments Act

Mark Begich (Photo: http://www.begich.senate.gov)

U.S. Senators Mark Begich, Roger Wicker (R-MS) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) introduced legislation to strengthen the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Commissioned Officer Corps as a national asset and improve its ability to recruit and retain talented candidates like other uniformed services. Begich is chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard. Wicker and Schatz serve on the subcommittee as well. The NOAA Corps’ primary mission is to operate NOAA’s fleet of research ships and aircraft.

MSI to Train NOAA Officers

Maritime Simulation Institute to Provide Professional Maritime Training to NOAA Officers; Instruction to Include Critical Simulator Experience in Shiphandling at Institute Headquarters. The Maritime Simulation Institute was recently selected to provide professional maritime training to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Corps Officers. In the NOAA Basic Officer Training Class, professional maritime instructors from the Maritime Simulation Institute will train the initial accession NOAA Corps Officers in the nautical sciences including basic safety training, seamanship, electronic navigation, ship stability, Rules of the Road, and shiphandling.

NOAA's Thomas Jefferson Conducting Surveys

NOAA "Thomas Jefferson"

NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson conducts sea floor surveys to keep shipping safe along Long Island coast. NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson continues today on a three-month survey of the sea floor off the coast of New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island, as part of a multi-year effort to update nautical charts for Block Island Sound and keep large ships and commerce moving safely. In addition to supporting marine navigation, data acquired by the 208-foot hydrographic survey vessel will also support a seafloor mapping initiative by Connecticut and New York.

NOAA Ship Rainier Returns to Alaska for Sea Floor Surveys

NOAA Ship Rainier returns to Alaska to conduct sea floor surveys in support of safe navigation. NOAA Ship Rainier has begun a month long survey of the sea floor near Alaska’s Prince of Wales Island as part of a multi-year effort to update nautical charts for the area. In addition to supporting marine navigation, data acquired by the 231-foot hydrographic survey vessel will also support marine ecosystem studies and improve inundation models for areas vulnerable to tsunamis. “We are pleased to return to Alaska to continue these important surveys…

Sonar Imagery Assists Bow Mariner Investigation

The Coast Guard has released two multi-beam sonar images taken by the NOAA ship Rude of the sunken tanker Bow Mariner. The images, taken March 4, are among a suite of side-scan sonar and multi-beam images provided by RUDE to the Coast Guard for use in its investigation of the cause of the explosion that sank the vessel on February 28. Rude (pronounced Rudy) found the wreck on March 2, and initial side-scan imagery showed the placement and orientation of Bow Mariner. However, Rude had to discontinue operations because of bad weather.

NOAA Ship Decommissioned

U.S. decommissioned today in a ceremony at its home port in Norfolk, Va. waterways. manages the NOAA fleet of ships and aircraft. efficiently. charts. survey platform in the world. maritime commerce. terabytes - one terabyte equaling 1,000 gigabytes. mosaics as well as imagery of historical wrecks like the USS Monitor. oceanography, fisheries research and homeland security surveys. security and nautical charting and returned in November. marked an end to its 39 years of service. and all waters in between. the nation. finding the wreckage of John F. Kennedy's aircraft in 1999. 990 off the coast of Rhode Island. Cmdr. two years. Air 990 recovery efforts. tragedies involving aircraft lost at sea. who served in the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. and the U.S. Naval Academy.

NOAA Mariner Dies When Survey Launch Capsizes

Eric Koss of Woodinville, Wash., was killed August 13 when the hydrographic survey launch he was piloting in Prince William Sound, Alaska, capsized after being struck by high waves, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said today. NOAA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Koss, a member of the crew of the NOAA hydrographic survey ship Rainier, and two other crew members, David Fischman and NOAA Corps Ensign Jennifer Johnson, were in a small launch conducting surveys of the sea bottom off Point Elrington, Elrington Island, in Resurrection Bay. The work had been underway in rough seas, conditions that were normal for that area. The launch was apparently hit by high waves, which turned the boat sideways and capsized it.

NOAA’s Fairweather Maps Bering Straits

Using state-of-the-art echo sounding technology, NOAA Ship Fairweather is detecting navigational dangers in critical Arctic waterways. (Photo courtesy NOAA)

Responding to a request from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, Alaska Maritime Pilots and the commercial shipping industry, NOAA sent one of its surveying vessels, NOAA Ship Fairweather, to detect navigational dangers in critical Arctic waters that have not been charted for more than 50 years. Fairweather, whose homeport is Ketchikan, Alaska, will spend July and August examining seafloor features, measuring ocean depths and supplying data for updating NOAA’s nautical charts spanning 350 square nautical miles in the Bering Straits around Cape Prince of Wales.

NOAA Fairweather Departs on Survey Mission

NOAA Ship Fairweather, a 231-foot survey vessel, departed Kodiak, Alaska, today on a mission to conduct hydrographic surveys in remote areas of the Arctic where depths have not been measured since before the U.S. bought Alaska in 1867. NOAA will use the data to update nautical charts to help mariners safely navigate this  important but sparsely charted region, which is now seeing increased vessel traffic because of the significant loss of  Arctic sea ice. Over the next two months, Fairweather will conduct hydrographic surveys covering 402 square nautical miles of navigationally significant waters in Kotzebue Sound, a regional distribution hub in northwestern Alaska in the Arctic Circle.

NOAA to Christen New Research Vessel

NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary will christen its new research vessel on May 12. sanctuary use. emerging management issues. Frank Kelly, Santa Barbara Harbor Commissioner Captain Ted I. Lillestolen (NOAA Corps), associate deputy assistant administrator for NOAA's National Ocean Service, Daniel J. Basta, director, National Marine Sanctuary Program and Chris Mobley, manager, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.

USCG, NOAA Ink Fleet Plan Agreement

Coast Guard Vice Adm. Charles Michel, deputy commandant for operations, and NOAA Vice Adm. Michael Devany, deputy under secretary for operations, sign the Fleet Plan Agreement letter of promulgation at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C Oct. 8, 2014 (Photo: NOAA)

Senior leaders from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) signed a Fleet Plan and Officer Exchange memorandum of understanding Wednesday at a ceremony at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters. Coast Guard Vice Adm. Charles Michel, deputy commandant for operations, and NOAA Vice Adm. Michael Devany, deputy under secretary for operations, were the signing officials for the joint letter of promulgation. The Coast Guard and NOAA have collaborated for more than 200 years.

NOAA and VT Halter Launch Another Fisheries Survey Vessel

VT Halter Marine, Inc. launched the second of four planned NOAA fisheries survey vessels. christened Henry B. N.H., on behalf of the ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Hampshire. vessels in the world when placed in operation in late 2006. Mrs. but designated Silver as her representative. Winnacunnet High School who won a regional NOAA contest in 2004 to name the ship. students also participated in the ship’s keel laying ceremony in May 2004. environment as well as to generate a greater interest in scientific studies. “The christening of Henry B. our NOAA fleet,” said retired Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. appreciate the contribution Mrs. that Ms. mission to assess and protect the nation’s living marine resources. Henry B.

NOAA: New AK Chart Makes Arctic Safer

NOAA: New Alaska navigational chart makes increased Arctic shipping safer; Kotzebue Harbor chart replaces measurements last taken in 19th century. NOAA formally presented today to Alaska officials a new nautical chart for Kotzebue Sound in the Alaskan Arctic, a sparsely charted region that is seeing increased vessel traffic because of the significant loss of summer sea ice. The new chart depicts the full range of depth measurements and object detection acquired during a full ocean bottom survey last summer by the NOAA hydrographic survey ship Fairweather.

Capt. Score Takes Command of NOAA’s Atlantic Fleet

NOAA Capt. David A. Score assumed command of the agency’s Marine Operations Center-Atlantic in Norfolk, Va., which manages the day-to-day operations of the nine research and survey ships in NOAA’s Atlantic fleet. Each year these NOAA ships conduct dozens of missions to assess fish and marine mammal stocks, conduct coral reef research, collect seafloor data to update nautical charts, and explore the ocean. Capt. Score served most recently as commanding officer of NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter, which conducted key research missions during the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill response, including missions to detect subsurface oil and study marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. Score relieves Rear Adm. (select) Michael S. Devany, who has served as the center’s commanding officer since June 2009.

NOAA, Navy Monitor Ocean Conditions Near Spill

Photo courtesy NOAA

NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson is underway on a mission to deploy a variety of U.S. Navy ocean monitoring instruments in the vicinity of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The floats, drifters and autonomous underwater vehicles will aid researchers in monitoring the surface and deep currents that are distributing the oil. Of particular interest is the Loop Current and its potential to spread the oil to a much wider area. “NOAA is proud to partner with the U.S. Navy in the ongoing…

NOAA's 15-Year Plan to Invest in Ships

15 years. scientists. Vice Admiral Conrad C. commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. arrived at NOAA in 2001, the average age of our fleet was 32 years. next 15 years. to systematically replace or upgrade the fleet. ocean and climate studies. not found in the commercial fleet. on Aug. 13. Bell M. Shimada, which will be homeported on the West Coast. Marine and Aviation Operations. personnel.

Mahoney Sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Commerce For Oceans and Atmosphere

At a Commerce Department ceremony in Washington, D.C., today James R. Mahoney, was sworn in as the assistant secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere. In this capacity, he is a chief manager of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the nation's top science agency for oceans and the atmosphere under its current administrator Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, USN (ret.). Commerce Secretary Don Evans administered the oath of office. "President Bush and I are very pleased to have Jim Mahoney on the NOAA team," said Commerce Secretary Don Evans. NOAA manages the U.S. operational weather and environmental satellites, a fleet of research ships and aircraft, and 12 environmental research laboratories.

VT Halter Marine to Build Swath Vessel for NOAA

Photo Credit: NOAANOAA announced that VT Halter Marine Inc. of Pascagoula, Miss., will complete the final design and build of a new Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull Coastal Mapping Vessel, or SWATH CMV, for the agency. NOAA exercised a $15m option for the ship with VT Halter Marine, which also completed the vessel's preliminary design under a separate option. The primary mission of the SWATH CMV will be to map the full seafloor in coastal areas for the nation's nautical charts. It will operate in waterways along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, Caribbean Sea and Great Lakes, conducting basic hydrographic surveys of the seafloor using side scan and multibeam sonar technologies.

Subsea Wreck Identifed Off NJ Coast 153 Years On

Robert J. Walker wreck investigations: Photo courtesy of NOAA

Lost after a violent collision at sea, government and university maritime archaeologists have identified the wreck of the ship 'Robert J. Walker', a steamer that served in the U.S. Coast Survey, a predecessor agency of NOAA. Twenty sailors died when the Walker sank in rough seas in the early morning hours of June 21, 1860, ten miles off Absecon Inlet on the New Jersey coast. The crew had finished its latest surveys in the Gulf of Mexico and was sailing to New York when the Walker was hit by a commercial schooner off New Jersey.

NOAA Assists in Waterway Clean Up

Less than two weeks after Katrina made landfall, ports along the Gulf coast and channels on the Mississippi River are once again navigational and safe for ship traffic. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the federal agency responsible for providing the nation’s nautical charts, has played a key role in a major interagency effort to ensure that navigational areas affected by Hurricane Katrina are clear of obstructions and debris. NOAA led the surveying effort to open the region’s ports and shipping channels as soon as possible, and anticipates all needed surveys will be completed by Saturday. NOAA has survey teams in the Mid-Atlantic pre-positioned to survey shipping channels immediately after Hurricane Ophelia passes.

Navy, NOAA, USCG Sign Memorandum of Understanding

By Lt. j.g. Top officials from the U.S. Navy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the U.S. Coast Guard signed a Memorandum of Understanding July 21, reaffirming their support of the National Ice Center (NIC). The NIC, an interagency office jointly operated by the Navy (Naval Ice Center), NOAA and Coast Guard, provides strategic and tactical ice analyses and other services that aid the navigation of U.S. vessels in ice-infested waters. “Today’s update to our original working agreement, first signed in 1995, means that the National Ice Center can continue monitoring the waterways for potentially dangerous ice and help guide ships out of harm’s way for the safe, efficient delivery of goods,” said retired Vice Adm. Conrad C.

NOAA Deploys Survey Ships for Arctic Charting Projects

NOAA ships spent the last several days preparing for their Arctic missions. Here, Chief Bosun Jim Kruger (front) works with Jason Kinyon and Lindsey Houska on NOAA Ship Rainier as they get ready to depart this week for the summer's first Arctic survey project, in Kotzebue Sound.(Credit: NOAA)

NOAA announced the official launch of its 2015 Arctic hydrographic survey season took place this morning, in Kodiak, Alaska, in a World Ocean Day ceremony which showcased the deployment of the NOAA ships Rainier and Fairweather. “Most Arctic waters that are charted were surveyed with obsolete technology, with some of the information dating back to Captain Cook's voyages, long before the region was part of the United States,” said NOAA deputy under secretary for operations Vice Admiral Michael S. Devany in remarks directed to the crews of NOAA ships.

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