Marine Link
Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Surface Navy Association News

Chief of Naval Research Helps Steer New Tech for the Fleet

Rear Adm. Mat Winter, chief of naval research, discusses game-changing technology for the warfighter during a keynote address at the 28th Annual Surface Navy Association National Symposium. The Department of the Navy's Office of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

When discussing the Navy’s top science and technology (S&T) priorities with military, government and industry leaders, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Mat Winter reflected on his college days at the University of Notre Dame. “When I graduated from Notre Dame 30 years ago, many of the things that the Navy had in the ‘petri dish’ back then, so to speak, are being used today throughout the fleet,” said Winter. On Jan. 13, Winter gave the keynote address at the Surface Navy Association’s 28th Annual Symposium, held in Crystal City, Virginia.

SNA Concludes Annual Symposium

Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, gives opening remarks at the 29th annual Surface Navy Association (SNA) National Symposium. Photo U.S. Navy by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ignacio Perez

The Surface Navy Association (SNA) concluded its 29th annual three-day symposium in Arlington, Virginia, Jan. 12. The symposium focused on distributed lethality to enable sea control and facilitated professional discussions between military members, industry representatives and lawmakers regarding surface warfare technology, tactics, training and career development. The first day commenced with welcomes, roundtable discussions and keynote addresses by Navy leaders, including Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. William Moran and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Steven Giordano. Vice Adm.

CSCS Educates at the SNA Symposium

Representatives from the Center for Surface Combat Systems (CSCS) educated the surface warfare community on who they train and how they support the Fleet at the Surface Navy Association (SNA) Symposium Jan. 12 - 14 (U.S. Navy photograph, courtesy Center for Surface Combat Systems)

Representatives from the Center for Surface Combat Systems (CSCS) educated the surface warfare community on who they train and how they support the Fleet at the Surface Navy Association (SNA) Symposium January 12-14. Capt. Bill McKinley, CSCS commanding officer, oversees 14 learning sites and is responsible for combat systems training across the rates of fire controlman, operations specialist, gunner’s mate, sonar technician surface, mineman, interior communications electrician, and electronics technician.

Navy Competes for Resources at Home, against Asymmetric Threats Abroad

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson speaks at the 28th annual Surface Navy Association Symposium in the Crystal City section of Arlington, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jessica Bidwell)

The U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations Adm. The document presents Richardson’s priorities with four “lines of effort” to strengthen naval power at and from the sea; achieve high velocity learning at every level; strengthen our Navy team for the future’ and expand and strengthen our network of partners. It isn’t an earth-shattering document, and perhaps is most telling for what it doesn’t say, as opposed to what is says. The document makes a strong case for forward presence, which has been the raison d’etre for the U.S. Navy for decades.

USCG Makes Headway in Challenging Waters

A patrol boat manned by members of Port Security Unit 311 deployed to Joint Task Force-Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, escorts the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf as it sails into Naval Base Guantanamo Bay.  The Coast Guard Cutter Waesche conducts at-sea refueling operations.  The Alameda-based cutter is named in honor of former Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Russell Waesche.  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Matthew Roache)

Day after day, the U.S. Coast Guard continues to conduct its 11 statutory missions with its limited resources. It is challenged to Invest in long-term operational capacity while continuing to carry out its daily missions. “We’re a small service, but as always, we do punch above our weight class,” said Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft during the 2015 Surface Navy Association symposium in Arlington, Virginia. While the Coast Guard may have drifted off course with its ambitious and holistic Deepwater recapitalization effort…

Trump's Navy: A Look at the Future US Navy

President Donald J. Trump speaks with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Trump visited to meet with Sailors and shipbuilders of the Navy’s first-in-class aircraft carrier during an all-hands call inside the ship’s hangar bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Joshua Sheppard)

It’s still too early to know for certain what the new administration will do about building up the U.S. Navy, as the numbers are a moving target. But with President Trump’s recent pledge to add $54 billion to defense spending, it’s a safe bet to make that the fleet will grow. So let’s start with the numbers. There are different ways to count the fleet size, including whether or not you count auxiliaries, but let’s use this number as the baseline: There are 274 ships in the U.S. Navy now.

Merriman Enters New Role at Fairbanks Morse

Rhett Merriman

Fairbanks Morse Engine, an EnPro Industries company, has named Rhett Merriman sales manager for marine power systems. Merriman, a veteran Fairbanks Morse manager, brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to his new role. Throughout his 36-year career he has been involved with bringing large, complex power system projects from the proposal, bidding and contract development phase through project management to successful completion. Most recently he was manager of application engineering and earlier, he served as manager of government engine sales.

GOST to Debut its Latest at MSE Conference

GOST Watch HD H20

Marine Security Leader Demonstrates Latest Innovative Surveillance Systems Fort Lauderdale, Fla. today that it will highlight its newest commercial maritime products at the 2016 Maritime Security East conference in Norfolk, Virginia, March 21 through 23, in booth #14. GOST will showcase its GOST Watch HD H20 at the Maritime Security East conference, this year. Designed to withstand the rigors of commercial maritime use, the GOST Watch HD H20 is a revolutionary new video surveillance system, housed in a compact, IP67 certified waterproof, impact-resistant, fiberglass container.

SNA West Coast Symposium 2014

The Surface Navy Association will hold its annual West Coast Symposium at Naval Station San Diego on August 21. The event will be held on the waterfront at Pier 2. Deputy Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, U.S. Central Command Rear Adm. Jim Loeblein will describe the dynamic maritime operational picture in the U.S. Fifth Fleet area of responsibility. Closer to home, Vice Adm. Kenneth Floyd will share his views on the recently completed RIMPAC exercises around Hawaii and the west coast. Rear Adm. Jim Kilby, who recently took command of the newly established Naval Surface Warfare Development Center, will provide the Navy’s vision of tactics for the future. Capt. John Fuller, will provide an update on the littoral combat ship (LCS) mission modules.

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

McCullough Takes Helm of Surface Navy Association

Barry McCullough

Retired Vice Adm. Barry McCullough has been named to succeed retired Vice Adm. Ron Route as president of the Surface Navy Association. Route will become the president of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., in early October. McCullough retired from the U.S. Navy in 2011 where he was Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/Commander, U.S. 10th Fleet. He also served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Integration of Capabilities (OPNAV N8) and Director of Surface Warfare (OPNAV N86).

‘Old Salt’ Designation Passed to Vice Adm. Tidd

Vice Adm. Kurt Tidd accepts the "Old Salt" award during a ceremony at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Tidd is the 19th recipient of the "Old Salt" award, presented to the longest serving surface warfare officer on continuous active duty. (US Navy photo by Tyrell K. Morris)

The “Old Salt” designation, honoring the Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) serving on active duty with the earliest Surface Warfare Qualification, passed from Adm. Sam Locklear to Vice Adm. Kurt Tidd at a June 22, 2015 ceremony at Washington, DC. Locklear, the recent Commander, U.S. Pacific Command, retired on June 30, 2015. Tidd is currently the Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff. Locklear has been the “Old Salt” since May 2014. “In the Navy, we have an expression for a respected, experienced and knowledgeable mariner. We call them ‘Old Salts,’” said Vice Adm.

Naval Symposium Examines Ship Capabilities, Career Options

Vice Adm. Tom Rowden (E.H. Lundquist photo)

The annual Surface Navy Association (SNA) West Coast Symposium was held on the waterfront at Naval Station San Diego on July 16, and provided attendees an update on some key operational and career developments important to the surface warfare community. Capt. Mark Johnson, president of the SNA San Diego Chapter, was the host and master of ceremonies for the symposium. Capt. Warren Buller, commander of LCS Squadron 1, provided a comprehensive update on the LCS program, to include a detailed summary of the status of mission package development.

Top Brass Due at Upcoming SNA Symposium

SNA Symbols

The first big naval professional development event of the year, the Surface Navy Association’s 2014 Symposium,  kicks off in Crystal City, Virginia, with the theme, “Surface Warfare…Warfighting First.”  Leaders in the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard will speak at the symposium and associated events starting Tuesday, January 14, 2014. The symposium kicks off with the SNA annual meeting and, focusing on the warfighters of today and the future, there will be a series of roundtables for junior officers, enlisted surface warriors and midshipmen from NROTC units and the Naval Academy.

U.S. Surface Navy Priorities Updated

Ships from the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group simulate a strait transit in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 10, 2013. The strike group was conducting a pre-deployment evaluation. (U.S. Navy Photo by Justin Wolpert)

The progress we have made in understanding and funding manpower shortages, establishing and funding defendable maintenance requirements, stabilizing procurement accounts, and the successful deployment of the littoral combat ship USS Freedom to the Western Pacific have led me to reassess the N96 Surface Warfare priorities. As President Obama highlighted in his Defense Strategic Guidance, the center of world mass is moving east towards Asia. This new focus brings into sharp relief…

New Navy O-FRP Emphasizes Training

Adm. Bill Gortney, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF), leads a discussion about the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) at the 26th annual Surface Navy Association Symposium (SNA) (U.S. Navy photo by Capt. Jane Campbell)

The U.S. Navy's new Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) was unveiled in a keynote address delivered at the 26th Annual Surface Navy Association National Symposium in Crystal City, Va., Jan. 15. Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney explained the changes to the new O-FRP, addressing Quality of Service and blending both Quality of Work and Quality of Life efforts by providing stability and predictability to deployment schedules over a 36 month O-FRP cycle. One of the highlights from his address was the Navy's efforts to lock in eight month deployment schedules for Sailors.

'A Sea Change in Standing Watch' Wins SNS Literary Prize

Adm. Jonathan Greenert at SNA Symposium: Photo credit USN

The Surface Navy Association (SNA) has presented its Literary Award for articles that address areas within Surface Navy or Surface Warfare and in 2013 it came to Capt. John Cordle, USN (Ret) and co-author Dr. Nita Shattuck for their article on watchkeeping and circadian-based alternatives. 'A Sea Change in Standing Watch,' published in the January 2013 issue of Proceedings, addresses the challenges and benefits of implementing a circadian-based watch schedule to improve the work-to-rest ratios of Sailors onboard Navy ships through two lenses…

GE Marine Gas Turbine for New US Navy Destroyer

LM2500 (Photo: GE Marine)

GE’s Marine Solutions said it has shipped a LM2500 marine gas turbine propulsion module that will help power the U.S. Navy’s 75th DDG Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), the company reported at the Surface Navy Association’s 30th Annual Symposium. Shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Ingalls Shipbuilding division will construct this new destroyer with U.S. Navy Flight III upgrades incorporated. Each DDG destroyer features four GE LM2500 marine gas turbines in a COmbined Gas turbine And Gas turbine (COGAG) configuration. “Since 1991 – for just the U.S.

SCA Decries Linkage of Jones Act to El Faro Tragedy

Matt Paxton, President of the Shipbuilders' Council of America (SCA).

U.S. Today the U.S. shipbuilding and ship repair industry responded to unfounded claims purporting a causal link between the Jones Act and the loss of the cargo container ship El Faro in Hurricane Joaquin earlier this month -- a loss that tragically claimed the lives of 33 crewmembers who were carrying out their duties in service to the Puerto Rican people. The entire maritime industry has been mourning this loss. In the wake of this tragedy, critics have attempted to blame the loss of the ship on the Jones Act requirement that ships operating between two U.S. ports be U.S.

General Dynamics Enhancing US Navy Capabilities

General Dynamics Mission Systems Presents Portfolio of Capabilities to Defend, Protect and Connect the U.S. Navy

General Dynamics Mission Systems makes its debut as General Dynamics' newest business unit at the Surface Navy Association's (SNA) 27th National Symposium. General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems and General Dynamics C4 Systems combined to form General Dynamics Mission Systems on January 1, 2015. "This restructuring has allowed us to create a real powerhouse. We are stronger together and offer a more robust portfolio of products, services and solutions that help customers successfully execute their missions in today's dynamic environment…

US Navy Sees Competition for Next Amphibious Ship

LPD-17 (Photo courtesy: Huntington Ingalls)

The U.S. Navy will insist on competition for the next U.S. amphibious warship despite a decision last year to base the ship on the LPD-17 ship designed by Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc, Marine Corps Major General Robert Walsh said on Tuesday. Walsh, who is director of the U.S. Navy's Expeditionary Warfare Division, said the U.S. military owned the design for the LPD-17 class of ships and would launch a competition for the new warship program known as LX (R). "Competition drives down cost," Walsh said after a speech at the annual symposium of the Surface Navy Association.

US Navy Renaming LCS Ships as 'Frigates'

Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy

U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus on Thursday said the Navy would rename the modified Littoral Combat Ships it plans to build in coming years as "frigates," given their enhanced capabilities. "One of the requirements of the Small Surface Combatant Task Force was to have a ship with frigate-like capabilities. Well, if it's like a frigate, why don't we call it a frigate?" Mabus told the annual conference of the Surface Navy Association. Mabus said the changed designation would apply primarily to the next 20 ships to be built…

US Navy Eyes Next LCS Contracts in Q1

Littoral combat ships USS Independence (LCS 2) and USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Keith DeVinney)

The U.S. Navy plans to award contracts before the end of the first quarter to Lockheed Martin Corp and Australia's Austal for its next three Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) as well as money to buy materials for a fourth, Navy officials said Thursday. Navy acquisition chief Sean Stackley told reporters the Navy was in talks with both companies and expected to award contracts before the pricing in the current proposals expired at the end of March. Rear Admiral Brian Antonio, program executive officer for the LCS ships…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jul 2018 - Marine Communications Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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