Marine Link
Friday, August 17, 2018

Us Environmental Protection Agency News

Wärtsilä 34DF Engine Awarded EPA Tier III Certification

A six-cylinder Wärtsilä 34DF dual-fuel engine (Image: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä marks another milestone for its Wärtsilä 34DF dual-fuel engine.The 34DF engine has been awarded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Tier III certification for diesel mode operation when installed together with the Wärtsilä NOx Reducer (NOR) system, a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system that converts nitrogen oxides (NOx) with the aid of a catalyst into diatomic nitrogen (N2) and water.Wärtsilä said it is the first engine manufacturer to be awarded…

REGULATORY WATCH: The Global 0.50% Sulfur Cap: 30 months and counting down …

Industry frets about the coming deadline. Shipping desperately wants to be ready, but will global shore-based infrastructure and refining capacity match the demand that is sure to come? And … are regulators listening to industry’s concerns? In early June, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a public workshop in Washington to help the agencies prepare for the January 1, 2020 deadline for worldwide implementation of very low sulfur marine fuel that meets the new 0.50% sulfur cap as set forth by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

The EPA's Clean Water Act and Understanding VGP

The Vessel General Permit (VGP) falls under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA), better known as the Clean Water Act. It is administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), an agency not well known or understood by the maritime industry.For years, the EPA had adopted a policy of broadly exempting discharges into the water that were incidental to normal operation of vessels. That changed after environmental advocacy groups prevailed in a judicial challenge. The first iteration of the VGP entered into effect in 2008 and remained in effect until replaced by the current iteration in 2013.

Thordon Bearings: EAL Protection in a Class of its Own

The ideal solution for the tightening regulatory noose also brings a different (and welcome) shade of ‘green’ for workboat operators.As the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA ramps up enforcement of regulations that mandate that all vessels over 24 meters (78 feet) operating in US waters must switch over to EALs in all oil-to-sea interfaces before their next drydocking, it is an arguably good time to be in the lubricants business. At the same time, Thordon Bearings, a manufacturer of seawater lubricated bearings for the marine industry has its own thoughts on that very topic.

Study: Nonnative Species Carried in Lakers' Ballast Water

© johnsroad7 / Adobe Stock

A recent study on nonindigenous species of plankton in ballast discharges from U.S. and Canadian lakers to western Lake Superior documented five species of nonindigenous zooplankton not yet established in western Lake Superior, including Hemimysis anomala (“bloody red shrimp”), in ballast water discharged there. It also detected, in uptake water, a species of zooplankton (Paraleptastacus wilsoni) that had not previously been recorded in the Great Lakes.Some of the species, including this one, live in harbor sediment and may have escaped routine surveillance to date.

It All Flows Downstream

Omni Catamaran cleaning Chicago waterway (Photo: Elastec)

Oil spills, trash, debris, sediment, chemicals: how do we keep our waterways clean? If an oil spill happens on water, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90) has very clear rules on who is responsible for paying for cleanup costs. Most oil spills can be traced to the spiller – a pipeline owner, oil tanker, shipper, railroad or trucking company. “Pointing a finger” at the alleged party may be why this type of pollution is referred to as “point source.” If the oil spill is ruled an accident and the polluter is not legally responsible…

DSC Delivers Its First Tier 4 Final Dredge

(Photo: DSC Dredge)

In February 2017, DSC Dredge, based in Reserve, La., delivered its first-ever dredge equipped with a Tier 4 Final C32 ACERT Caterpillar engine to a minerals company located in the U.S. The Shark Class Dredge features an 18-inch hull-mounted dredge pump and 300 hp cutter drive assembly, and has a dredging depth capability of 56 feet. DSC supplied stainless steel hydraulic fittings and used anti-corrosion building practices, as the dredge will be working in a corrosive environment.

Port of Long Beach Achieves Record Pollution Reductions

The Port of Long Beach Middle Harbor rendering (CREDIT: POLB)

The Port of Long Beach notched clean air records in its latest study of air pollution emissions, including an 88 percent reduction in diesel particulate matter, continuing more than a decade of air quality improvements. The first phase of the zero-emissions Long Beach Container Terminal opened on Pier E in 2016, helping to drive down the air pollution tallied in the Port’s annual Emissions Inventory, which was completed this week. The Port has been monitoring its progress in air quality improvements since 2005.

Harvey Impacts Domestic Fuel Network

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) leeylutung)

U.S. drivers are starting to feel the effects of Tropical Storm Harvey in their wallets as the country's fuel distribution network starting at the Gulf Coast and stretching across the country is squeezed by floods, refinery closures and dwindling supplies. At least 3.6 million barrels per day (bpd) of refining capacity is offline and more refineries are at risk of shut downs as the storm relentlessly dumps rain on Texas and heads toward Louisiana. The longer refineries remain shut, the more retail prices will increase, traders and analysts said.

Oil, Chemical Spills from Harvey Adding Up

File Image: a typical spill boom as deployed (CREDIT: Elastec)

More than 22,000 barrels of oil, refined fuels and chemicals spilled at sites across Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, along with millions of cubic feet of natural gas and hundreds of tons of other toxic substances, a Reuters review of company reports to the U.S. Coast Guard shows. The spills, clustered around the heart of the U.S. oil industry, together rank among the worst environmental mishaps in the country in years, but fall far short of the roughly 190,000 barrels spilled in Louisiana in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina - the last major storm to take dead aim at the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Oil/Chemical Spills from Harvey Are Big, but Dwarfed by Katrina

More than 22,000 barrels of oil, refined fuels and chemicals spilled at sites across Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, along with millions of cubic feet of natural gas and hundreds of tons of other toxic substances, a Reuters review of company reports to the U.S. Coast Guard shows. The spills, clustered around the heart of the U.S. oil industry, together rank among the worst environmental mishaps in the country in years, but fall far short of the roughly 190,000 barrels spilled in Louisiana in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina - the last major storm to take dead aim at the U.S. Gulf Coast. Harvey slammed ashore in Texas on Aug. 26, unleashing record flooding around Houston that destroyed countless homes, displaced around a million people and killed scores. The U.S.

T/S Nate Kills 22 in Central America, Bears Down on U.S. GoM

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) mode_list)

Tropical Storm Nate killed at least 22 people in Central America on Thursday as it pummeled the region with heavy rain while heading toward Mexico's Caribbean resorts and the U.S. Gulf Coast, where it could strike as a hurricane this weekend. In Nicaragua, at least 11 people died, seven others were reported missing and thousands had to evacuate homes because of flooding, said the country's vice president Rosario Murillo. Emergency officials in Costa Rica reported that at least eight people were killed due to the lashing rain, including two children.

John Deere Rolls Out Trio of Marine Engines

4045SFM85 (Photo: John Deere Power Systems)

John Deere Power Systems has expanded its lineup with three new marine engines available for order from early 2018. The new 4.5L PowerTech 4045SFM85 offers high power to weight ratio for repowering and new vessel construction, and is ideal for planing and semi-displacement hulls, the manufacturer said. It has two ratings for light-duty commercial vessels, high-speed governmental applications and high-speed pleasure craft, which includes an M4 rating with 205 kW (275 hp) at 2,600 rpm and M5 rating with 235 kW (315 hp) at 2,800 rpm. The 4045SFM85 propulsion engine ratings will meet U.S.

EPA Provides $650K for Diesel Engine Refits

© Cliff W Estes / Adobe Stock

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is providing the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) with $650,000 to reduce diesel emissions from engines on up to eight vessels operating in the Puget Sound region. The project will provide vessel owners with incentives to scrap and replace 12-19 old Tier 0 engines with newer, more-efficient and lower-emission Tier 3 engines on six to eight harbor vessels operating in Puget Sound, Lake Union and Lake Washington. Combined with the mandatory match of $891,000, the total project cost is $1,541,000.

Crowley Orders ATB at Bollinger

(Image: Crowley)

Crowley Fuels LLC has signed a contract with Bollinger Shipyards for the construction of a new 100,000-barrel-capacity articulated tug-barge (ATB) to transport multiple clean petroleum products in the Alaska market. The Alaska-class vessel will be built at Bollinger Marine Fabricators Shipyard, in Amelia, La., with an expected delivery in the fourth quarter of 2019. The build contract includes an option for a second ATB. Once built and deployed, Crowley will operate the ATB under a long-term charter with Alaska-based Petro Star Inc.…

Biodegradable Lubricants Under Spotlight

Photo: Thordon Bearings Inc.

Thordon Bearings has welcomed an industry initiative to evaluate the effect of biodegradable lubricants on sterntube bearings following a reported marked increase in sealed oil lubricated propeller shaft bearing failures. While many ship operators consider the rise in use of environmentally acceptable lubricants (EAL) a cure-all to meeting environmental regulations, particularly in waters where the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has regulated the use of mineral oils, their performance as a propeller shaft bearing lubricant has come under increasing scrutiny.

Cummins Unveils New EPA Tier 3 Marine Generator

(Photo: Cummins)

Cummins Inc. has expanded the power range of its U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 3 certified marine generator product line. Cummins will now feature a new Onan Marine QD series generator with a power range of 40 kWe to 65 kWe, offering customers reduced emissions with the quietest operation in the industry, according to the manufacturer. The series’ expanded power range was announced during the Miami International Boat Show, and comes as recreational vessels are requiring more electrical capacity to power increasing house loads.

Demanding Times for DSC Dredge

(Image: DSC Dredge)

The dynamic dredge builder navigates a complicated dredge building market by augmenting an impressive array of standard equipment with a customized approach that satisfies domestic and international customers alike. It isn’t as easy as it looks. The New Year typically brings new challenges to all sectors of the waterfront and 2018 will be no different. As the newly expanded and improved Panama and Suez Canals bring larger, so-called post-Panamax vessels to U.S. shores, stakeholders tend to focus on domestic dredging needs. And, there’s plenty of that to go around.

Tug, Switcher Engine Upgrades Offer Most Cost-Effective Options

© itsallgood / Adobe Stock

Clean diesel technology upgrades for large tug and switcher locomotive engines cost only $4,379 to $15,201 per ton of nitrogen oxides (NOx), compared to more than $30,000 per ton of NOx for many other diesel emission reduction projects. The Diesel Technology Forum (DTF) and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has released a report documenting the significant emission reduction benefits that can be gained by replacing older engines in tug boats and switcher locomotives with the latest clean diesel models.

Dieselgate 101: Opening the Door to Cleaner Engines

© itsallgood / Adobe Stock

Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time – or at least pay the staggering fine. And pay it forward, Volkwagen will. The auto manufacturer got caught using software to trick emissions control software during testing on some cars – nearly 500,000 2.0 liter and 83,000 3.0 liter diesel vehicles – in order to get a passing grade, after which the cars operated in violation of the Clean Air Act. The years of cheating on vehicles from model years 2009 to 2016 sold and leased in the U.S., resulted in emissions of up to 40 times the permitted level of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter.

Maritime to Get Biggest Bang for VW Settlement Bucks

© tarasov_vl / Adobe Stock

Imagine a settlement over falsifying emission levels in another transportation sector dropping money onto your deck. Who knew? But it’s true. The $2.9 billion settlement fund Volkswagen agreed to capitalize for distribution across all 50 states, tribal lands and Puerto Rico, as a result of “dieselgate,” its criminal dodging of required auto emission levels, presents an unparalleled opportunity to maritime companies that want to move their noxious diesel engines up a couple of EPA notches, and stick someone else with close to half the bill or more.

EPA Announces Funding to Reduce Diesel Emissions

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / © dbvirago)

Preference given to fleets in areas facing air quality challenges. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of grant funding to modernize the nation’s diesel fleet by retrofitting or replacing vehicles with cleaner, more efficient diesel engines. EPA anticipates awarding approximately $40 million in Diesel Emission Reduction Program (DERA) grant funding to eligible applicants, subject to the availability of funds. “These grants will incentivize improvements to aging diesel fleets and improve air quality throughout the country…

New EAL Grease for ATB Couplings

Specialty lubricants manufacturer Klϋber Lubrication recently introduced a new environmentally acceptable lubricant (EAL) grease for articulated tug and barge (ATB) couplings, Klüberbio AM 12-501.Klüberbio AM 12-501 is an adhesive EAL grease designed specifically for the large plain bearings, rams and connectors used in ATB coupling systems. It is based on fully synthetic ester oils for high performance and biodegradability, aluminum complex thickener for adhesion and resistance to water and select additives to reduce wear.Klüberbio AM 12-501 meets ATB coupling system OEM specifications for pumpability, resistance to water washout and spray off, corrosion protection and load carrying capabilities.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Aug 2018 - The Shipyard Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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