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Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Us Steel News

Steel Industry Presses for an End to Unfair Trade

Mario Longhi

Today, United States Steel Corporation President and CEO Mario Longhi joined fellow steel industry executives and Leo Gerard, international president of the United Steelworkers, in pressing Congress to maintain America’s economic and national security by halting unfair trade practices and enforcing the country’s trade laws. Longhi encouraged action against illegal dumping of Oil Country Tubular Goods by South Korea and others who threaten American jobs, infrastructure and our national security.

US Says China to Scrap Some Export Subsidies

China has agreed to scrap export subsidies on a range of products from metals to agriculture and textiles, the United States said on Thursday, in a step by Beijing to reduce trade frictions with Washington. China is to end a program known as its "demonstration bases-common service platform," which provides export subsidies to Chinese companies in seven economic sectors, the U.S. trade representative's office said. Some industry figures were skeptical about the deal's impact, especially regarding steel, which has been a flashpoint with Chinese overcapacity pressuring U.S. suppliers. One source knowledgeable about the agreement said it was not comprehensive enough to do much to help the U.S. steel industry, given its focus was only on specialty products.

Ship Loading Indiana Steel For Export to Spain

About 11,000 tons of Indiana-made steel will set sail for Spain. The Julietta arrived at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor and was being loaded with hot-rolled steel coils from Mittal Steel in East Chicago, Ind. This is the first export shipment of steel through the Port of Indiana since 2005. There were a few export steel shipments between 2003 and 2005 – just over 55,000 tons total. In 1995, the port handled an all-time high 243,000 tons of exported steel. The shipment is destined for Pasajes, Spain. Federal Marine Terminals, which serves as the port’s general cargo stevedore, will load the vessel today and tomorrow. Since the Port of Indiana also has year-round access to the inland river system…

US Steel Producers Win Anti-dumping Case

The United States has approved anti-dumping duties against South Korea and other producers of steel pipes for the energy sector, a victory for domestic producers hoping to benefit from a boom in the U.S. shale oil and gas industry. U.S. steel companies lodged a complaint in 2013 as foreign manufacturers cashed in on soaring U.S. energy infrastructure demand. Imports doubled last year and accounted for nearly two-thirds of the domestic market, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute. Although subject to appeal, the decision puts the U.S. Department of Commerce closer to imposing tariffs as high as 118 percent on "oil country tubular goods" (OCTG).

Ports of Indiana Handled $1.89b cargo in 2006

Steel shipments helped the Ports of Indiana set a new record of $1.89b of cargo handled in 2006. This was a 23-percent increase from 2005, which had been the previous 36-year high. Steel accounted for $955 million of the 2006 shipments, a 45 percent increase from the previous year. The Ports of Indiana surpassed $1 billion in cargo shipments for the third consecutive year – the only three years this has been accomplished since Indiana’s first port opened in 1970. All three of Indiana’s ports on Lake Michigan and the Ohio River set individual records for total shipments in 2006 – Mount Vernon: $482 million (+20%), Jeffersonville: $588 million (+30%) and Burns Harbor/Portage: $820 million (+21%).

U.S. Ports Defy Slower August Trend – Report Positive Tonnage

U.S. ports reported upticks in tonnage during the normal summer slowdown period. The Seaway’s year-to-date total cargo shipments from March 22 to August 31 were 22 million metric tons, up 3.5 percent from the same period last year. “In addition to the cargo shipments increase, vessel transits are up 9 percent from a year ago with the best performers in August being petroleum products, scrap metal and salt. This number shows that the marine trade, even in today’s tough economic times…

POSCO Plans Port Plant at Indiana-Jeffersonville

Courtesy Port of Indiana

POSCO, a multinational company headquartered in Pohang, South Korea, and the fifth-largest steel producer in the world, has announced plans to build a wire rod processing center at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, creating up to 60 high-wage jobs by 2018. POSCO is South Korea's fourth largest company, behind Samsung Electronics, SK Holdings and Hyundai Motors, and is ranked No. 162 in Fortune's Global 500. "Although we are located on different continents, South Korea and Indiana both share a reputation of excellence when it comes to advanced manufacturing," said Governor Mike Pence.

Duluth Port Executive Director to Retire

Adolph Ojard (Photo: Duluth Seaway Port Authority)

Adolph Ojard, Executive Director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, plans to retire this year after serving in that leadership role for the past decade. A national search is underway for a new Executive Director. The board anticipates having that person hired by the end of summer/early fall. After a brief transitional time, Ojard will then settle into retirement. Ojard was appointed executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority in March 2003. A Great Lakes maritime and transportation veteran, he now serves as the Port Authority's chief executive officer.

Obituary: Joseph E. LeBlanc Jr.

Joe LeBlanc with his wife, Betty

Joseph E. LeBlanc Jr. passed away on June 27, 2014. He was 87 years old. Joe was president of Three Rivers Rock Quarry in Smithland, Ky. (a division of Harbert Construction), Three Rivers Towing, Harcon Barge Lines and Louisiana Limestone during the late 60s and 70s. He also worked later for Luhr Brothers at their St. Genevieve, Mo. Facility and was General Manager for Boyce Machinery in Morgan City, La. for a few years and also worked as a consultant and for NREC in Houma after he retired. Prior to working for Harbert, LeBlanc was employed by Thomson Tractor in Birmingham, Ala.

Waterways Council, Inc. Names New Officers and Directors

At its Annual Meeting held October 18 in Nashville, the Board of Directors of Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) elected the following officers and Executive Committee members for 2006-2007: Mark Knoy, President, AEP MEMCO LLC, Chairman; R. Barry Palmer, WCI, President and CEO; Dan Mecklenborg, Senior Vice President, HR & Chief Legal Officer, Ingram Barge Company, First Vice Chairman and General Counsel; Kevin Sparks, Manager, Petrochemicals Marketing, Marathon Petroleum Co., LLC, Secretary/Treasurer; Peter Lilly, Chief Operating Officer-Coal, CONSOL Energy Inc., and Rick Calhoun, President, Cargo Carriers, Vice-Chairmen. Peter Stephaich, Chairman, Campbell Transportation Co; H.

Port of Indiana 40th Shipping Season

The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor opens its 40th shipping season on April 9 with the arrival of the first international vessel – the Iryda. For 40 years, this Great Lakes port has provided an international connection for local businesses to reach world markets. The first ship signifies the start of the shipping season, the arrival of vital materials for local business and the start of another work season for longshoremen, crane operators, truckers and businesses that depend on the port. The Iryda was built in 1999 in Chiba, Japan, located on Tokyo Bay. It brings roughly 9,000 tons of steel coils to the port from Ijmuiden, Holland. The ship made a stop in Cleveland on its way to Burns Harbor…

Waterways Council - Officers & Directors

At the Annual Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) Membership Meeting and Board of Directors Meeting held October 29 in St. Louis, the following officers and Executive Committee members were elected to serve or continue service for 2008-2009:  Dan Mecklenborg, Senior Vice President, HR & Chief Legal Officer, Ingram Barge Company, remains as Chairman of the Board; Cornel Martin, was elected President and CEO; Steve Little, President and CEO, Crounse Corporation, remains as General Counsel; Peter Stephaich, Chairman, Campbell Transportation Co., was re-elected Secretary; Cherrie Felder, Vice President, Channel Shipyard, remains as Treasurer. Former WCI President and CEO R. Barry Palmer was named President Emeritus. Also named to new terms as officers were Richard R.

Stimulus Funding for Port of Pittsburgh

“Fantastic”, was the response that James R. McCarville, Executive Director of the Port of Pittsburgh Commission, had to the announcement that the US Army Corps of Engineers planned to spend over $110m in Stimulus funding for navigation in southwestern Pa. Specifically, the $84m scheduled for Charleroi Lock in the Lower Mon 2-3-4 project, rescues a billion dollar project that otherwise might have had to go on to life support/shutdown. Those funds will be used to complete the construction of the river wall, and construct a new Upper Guard Wall and a new Lower Guard Wall to safely guide vessels in and out of the chamber. Thirteen million will be added to the $25.8m in the FY09 budget for repairs to the Emsworth Dam and $285…

Great Lakes Ports Association Elects New Leadership

Members of the American Great Lakes Ports Association (AGLPA) elected new leadership at their annual summer meeting held this year in Oswego, New York. The new president is William Friedman, President & CEO of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority. Dean Haen, director of the Brown County Port & Solid Waste Department in Green Bay, will serve as vice president. The secretary-treasurer position will be held by Paul LaMarre, port director at the Port of Monroe (Michigan). The term of office is two years. Friedman became president and CEO of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority in June 2010. He has more than 25 years of experience in port management, real estate development, international supply chain and multimodal distribution.

USS Fitzgerald Arrives in Pascagoula for Repair

Photo: United States Navy

U.S. Navy warship USS Fitzgerald, which was damaged and nearly sunk after a fatal collision with a cargo ship in June and then was damaged again while on board a heavy lift transport vessel, has arrived in Pascagoula, Miss., for repair work at Huntington Ingalls Industries shipyard. The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer arrived in Pascagoula on January 19, aboard heavy lift vessel MV Transshelf inward bound from Yokosuka, Japan. Fitzgerald is expected to spend several days in the Port of Pascagoula as the heavy lift ship will commence the reverse operation of unfastening…

Fifth Consecutive Record Year for Antwerp

Photo: Port of Antwerp

The port of Antwerp has achieved a record freight volume for the fifth straight year in a row. In 2017 the port handled 223,606,610 tonnes of freight, an increase of 4.4% compared with the previous year. Practically all sectors turned in an excellent performance: the container volume expanded in tonnage by 4.3% (123 million tonnes), liquid bulk such as oil derivatives by 5.7% (73.1 million tonnes), and conventional breakbulk such as steel by 4.8% (10.3 million tonnes), while ro/ro completed the growth list with 10.5% (5.1 million tonnes).

U.S. Tariffs on Steel Imports Impacts Rautaruukki

Steel exports to the USA accounted for just over 2.5 per cent of Rautaruukki's turnover in 2001. The Group supplied a total of some 4.7 million tonnes of steel last year, and just over 80,000 tonnes of this went to the USA. The US decision to impose tariffs on steel imports will not therefore have a major direct impact on Rautaruukki's business operations. Rautaruukki has alternative plans for sales to compensate for the exports to the USA. It is thought that the impact of the US decision to impose import tariffs, which was widely anticipated by the steel markets, has already been passed on to steel prices, which are low, at the end of 2001 and the start of this year. For that reason the US decision is not expected to have any major impact on product prices in Europe.

Report: Tariff Cost Ports Money, Jobs

According to reports, a 20-month tariff on imported steel resulted in a loss of 9.3m tons of the metal and more than 2,000 jobs at U.S. ports, according to a new report from a maritime economics consulting firm. The study by Martin Associates of Lancaster, Pa., commissioned by the American Institute for Imported Steel and the first to document the economic impact of the tariff, found that the trade restriction kept about 424,000 tons of steel and iron from going through U.S. ports in 2002 and 2003. The metals were instead shipped to other countries. The data will be used to oppose future tariff threats and to educate policymakers, said David Phelps, president of the AIIS.

MV Werften Cuts First Steel for Crystal Endeavor

Tan Sri Lim Kok Thay pushes the button to start the first steel cut (Photo: MV Werften)

Shipbuilder MV Werften said it has begun building Crystal’s new luxury expedition yacht, Crystal Endeavor, with first steel cut on January 15 at its shipyard in Stralsun, Germany. Set to debut in 2020, Crystal Endeavor will be Crystal’s largest and most spacious purpose-built Polar Class ship featuring all-suite, butler-serviced accommodations, and adventure in polar regions and other remote destinations. Employees and guests watched as the flame cutter was launched by Genting Hong Kong Chairman and CEO…

Market: Container Market Pauses

Early last year, “experts” were warning of a prolonged slump in the box trades, fueled by reckless over-ordering by irresponsible carriers and shipbuilders offering special deals on price. Howe Robinson's Container Index had sunk to a low point of 451 in January and leading liner company executives were attending hastily convened crisis summits to discuss possible lay-up schemes and other short-term survival strategies. Less than two years on, the market has paused briefly for breath after what brokers describe as an unbelievable recovery, both in its scale and speed. Last week's Howe Robinson index was just over 1104, slightly down on the previous couple of weeks but nevertheless attained in a consistent climb that, until now, has seen no breaks.

Peel Ports Pulls Out all the Stops

Operations team docks crucial bulk steel vessel at Port of Liverpool container terminal in order to overcome weather delays and provide an innovative customer-centric solution, which brings added value to customer supply chain. Peel Ports are never one to complain about gloomy weather, staying true to their values of being more than just a port; the owner and operator of the Port of Liverpool demonstrated innovative thinking and flexibility to solve challenges by taking on the elements.

China Places Duties on Steel

It appears the battle over steel continues. In the wake of the U.S. lifting its own 20-month tarriff on steel imports late last year, China, the world's top steel importer, has reportedly placed a hefty import duties on high-grade metal used by the shipbuilding sectors, according to a Reuters report. The U.S. lifted its tarriff in the face of a potential trade war over the matter. China reportedly implemented the new tariffs after it concluded that there was dumping of cold-rolled steel by Russia, South Korea, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Taiwan. South Korea's POSCO, the world's fourth-largest steel maker, will be exempted as Chinese authorities concluded it was not selling its cold-rolled products below market prices, Reuters reported.

Foreign Steel Cuts Lakers’ Ore Float in June

With foreign steel now commanding nearly 32 percent of the U.S. market, it was inevitable that iron ore cargos hauled in U.S.-flag Great Lakes freighters (lakers) would take a hit, and that hit came in June, the Lake Carriers’ Association (LCA) reported. Cargos totaled 4.4 million tons, a decrease of 17 percent compared to May and 10 percent compared to a year ago. “Although not unexpected, the slowdown in iron ore is troubling,” said LCA president James H.I. Weakley. “On average it takes about 1.5 tons of iron ore to make a ton of steel, so foreign steel that is dumped into the U.S. market takes ore and other cargos off the Lakes. It is imperative that the government enforce our trade laws…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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