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Monday, December 11, 2017

US' Most Advanced Warship Departs Bath Iron Works

September 9, 2016

  • The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo)
  • The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passing the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) as Zumwalt departs Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo)
  • The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo) The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo)
  • The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passing the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) as Zumwalt departs Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo) The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passing the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) as Zumwalt departs Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo)

The newest and most technologically advanced surface warship, future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), departed Maine shipyard Bath Iron Works September 7, marking the beginning of a three-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego.

 
Crewed by 147 sailors, the stealthy, powerful and lethal Zumwalt is the lead ship of the U.S. Navy’s next-generation class of multimission destroyers. They are capable of performing critical maritime missions and enhance the Navy’s ability to provide deterrence, power projection and sea control. 
 
Named for Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr., former chief of naval operations (CNO) from 1970 to 1974, the Zumwalt-class features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, a wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and the latest war fighting technology and weaponry available. 
 
“As the DDG 1000 sails into open water, Zumwalt is once again on active service in the U.S. Navy,” said Capt. James A. Kirk, Zumwalt's commanding officer.
 
DDG 1000 will be the first U.S. Navy combatant surface ship to utilize an integrated power system (IPS) to provide electric power for propulsion and ship services. The IPS generates approximately 78 megawatts of power, nearly what a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier generates, to meet the total ship electric power requirements and provide extra capacity to accommodate future weapons and computing systems.
 
“With 78 megawatts of power generation capacity readily available, DDG 1000 enters the Fleet bringing with it a new era of power generation, conversion and propulsion to the U.S. Navy,” Kirk said.
 
In addition to its advanced weapon and propulsion systems, Zumwalt is much larger than today's destroyers. At 610 feet long and 80.7 feet wide, Zumwalt is 100 feet longer and 13 feet wider and its flight deck is 93 percent larger than an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer.
 
In preparation for Zumwalt's departure from Bath, the crew recently completed an engineering light off assessment and crew certification to ensure the ship's readiness to join the surface fleet. 
 
USS Zumwalt will be formally commissioned during Fleet Week Maryland in Baltimore October 15. Following the commissioning ceremony Zumwalt will begin its transit to San Diego, making several port visits enroute. Upon arrival in San Diego, she is scheduled to take part in a Post Delivery Availability and Mission Systems Activation and is expected to be integrated into the fleet in 2018 following test and evaluation.
 
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