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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Clean Diesel News

EPA Provides $650K for Diesel Engine Refits

© Cliff W Estes / Adobe Stock

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is providing the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) with $650,000 to reduce diesel emissions from engines on up to eight vessels operating in the Puget Sound region. The project will provide vessel owners with incentives to scrap and replace 12-19 old Tier 0 engines with newer, more-efficient and lower-emission Tier 3 engines on six to eight harbor vessels operating in Puget Sound, Lake Union and Lake Washington. Combined with the mandatory match of $891,000, the total project cost is $1,541,000.

Los Angeles, Long Beach Ports Update Clean Air Action Plan

Photo: Port of Long Beach

As the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (POLA/POLB) begin final consideration of their updated 2017 Clean Air Action Plan, regulators must embrace the future role of diesel technology in the global goods movement sector and the substantial, immediate clean air and climate benefits that the latest clean diesel technologies offer. Because of its unique combination of power, performance, efficiency, reliability, durability and availability, diesel power is projected to remain the dominant technology for global goods movement on land and sea for the next period covered by this plan.

ARRA Funds for Cleaner Diesel in Port of Houston

EPA is awarding $9m in Recovery Act funds to support the SmartWay Clean Diesel Finance Program in the Houston-Galveston area. The Recovery Act grant will spur innovative clean diesel projects that protect air quality and create and retain jobs through an innovative financing program that will promote the purchase of new, cleaner or retrofitted vehicles and equipment at the Port of Houston. The Recovery Act funds will work to reduce premature deaths, asthma attacks and other respiratory ailments, lost work days, and many other health impacts every year. “Recovery Act dollars will help the Port better protect air quality and the health of nearby communities,” said Gina McCarthy, EPA Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation.

Clean Diesel Projects – EPA Grants Available

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the availability of up to $20 million in FY 2012 grant funding to establish clean diesel projects aimed at reducing harmful pollution from the nation's existing fleet of diesel engines and improving air quality and Americans' health. In addition to these grants, approximately $9 million will be available through direct state allocations. EPA estimates that for every $1 spent on clean diesel funding up to $13 of public health benefit is realized. "Technology has evolved to make diesel engines more efficient and cleaner than ever," said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation.

$20 Million Available for Clean Diesel Projects

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the availability of up to $20 million in FY 2012 grant funding to establish clean diesel projects aimed at reducing harmful pollution from the nation's existing fleet of diesel engines and improving air quality and Americans’ health. In addition to these grants, approximately $9 million will be available through direct state allocations. EPA estimates that for every $1 spent on clean diesel funding up to $13 of public health benefit is realized. "Technology has evolved to make diesel engines more efficient and cleaner than ever," said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. This is the first competition since the Diesel Emission Reduction Program, also known as DERA, was reauthorized in 2011.

Cat 3500 Engine Upgrade Kit Debuts

Photo courtesy Caterpillar Marine Communications

Caterpillar Inc. will be the only marine diesel engine manufacturer featured at the Diesel Technology Forum event held in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, September 29, 2009. Titled “Clean Diesel Power: Ready for Tomorrow, Working Today,” the Diesel Technology Forum will transform America’s “power capital” into the “clean diesel power capital” when dozens of manufacturers display their newest technology for the nation’s Congressional representatives. “Providing policymakers an up…

EPA Offers Up to $9 Million for Emission Reduction Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of up to $9 million through the National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program (DERA) for Fiscal Year 2013 for new projects to reduce emissions from the nation's existing fleet of diesel engines. The DERA program has significantly improved air quality and provided critical health benefits by reducing air pollution and saving millions of gallons of fuel. Diesel pollution is linked to a range of serious health problems including asthma, lung and heart disease, other respiratory ailments, and premature death. EPA estimates that clean diesel funding generates up to $13 of public health benefit for every $1 spent on diesel projects.

Diesel Forum Launches New Website

The Diesel Technology Forum today launched a new Web site focusing on clean diesel solutions to reduce emissions from existing diesel engines according to Forum Executive Director Allen Schaeffer. “This unique site is geared toward key stakeholders including trucking and transit bus fleet owners and operators, equipment operators, government officials, the media and general public,” stated Schaeffer. For nearly 18 months, the Diesel Technology Forum has been working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and state and regional governments providing technical, policy and program support for these programs. EPA has established a campaign goal of retrofitting 100,000 existing diesel engines by January 1, 2002.

EPA Grants for Diesel Tech

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Regions 9 and 10 have announced a regional competition through the West Coast Collaborative, for more than $5 million to deploy verified or certified clean diesel technologies. The EPA is encouraging all qualified applicants to submit proposals for funding now. It’s part of an initiative to significantly reduce diesel emissions in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the U.S. Pacific Islands. "We have to accelerate air quality improvements,” said Deborah Jordan, Air Division director for the U.S. EPA’s Pacific Southwest region. “One of the most cost-effective ways to do that is by modernizing our legacy diesel fleet.

EPA Report Highlights Benefits of Emissions Reduction Program

More than 50,000 older diesel powered engines were upgraded or replaced between 2008 to 2010 because of Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) funding which resulted in major clean air benefits and fuel savings, according a new report issued today - the “Second Report to Congress: Highlights of the Diesel Emissions Reduction Program” by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. “The results outlined in this report demonstrate that the clean diesel retrofit program (DERA) is one the nation’s rarest and best examples of a program that actually works, delivering big and real benefits in fuel savings and cleaner air to all 50 states, said Allen Schaeffer, the Executive Director of the Diesel Technology Forum.

$2.7M EPA Grant to Replace Tug Engines

EPA Invests $2.7 Million to Reduce Air Pollution from Old Diesel Engines in New York and New Jersey. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has provided a total of $2.7 million to help two organizations reduce air pollution in the New York metropolitan area by replacing old, dirty diesel engines on a tug boat and two trains with less polluting models. The projects will cut emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides by 70 tons per year and particulate matter by three tons per year. These pollutants are linked to health problems, including asthma, lung and heart disease and even premature death. Diesel engines are durable and often remain in use a long time. Older diesels that predate current and stricter air pollution standards emit large amounts of air pollutants.

EPA to Reduce Emissions with Engine Repower Cash

EPA has recently awarded $250,000 to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (ME DEP). Together with another $250,000 provided by the State, these funds will be used to repower two marine vessels, a passenger ferry and an excursion vessel, operating in the Gulf of Maine. Diesel engines contribute significantly to air pollution, especially in urban areas. The fine particles in diesel exhaust pose serious health risks, including aggravated asthma and other respiratory symptoms. Children are especially vulnerable to these effects. The Northeast has some of the highest asthma rates in the nation, including a childhood asthma rate above 10 percent in all six New England states.

EPA Offers $4 Million in Grants for Clean Diesel Projects

EPA is announcing the availability of $4 million in grant funding to establish clean diesel projects aimed at reducing emissions from marine and inland water ports, many of which are in areas that face environmental justice challenges. “Ports are essential to the nation’s economy and transportation infrastructure, but they also are home to some of the nation’s toughest environmental challenges,” said Janet McCabe, acting assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. Most of the country’s busiest ports are located near large metropolitan areas and, as a result, people in nearby communities can be exposed to high levels of diesel emissions. Older diesel engines can emit large amounts of air pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOX) and particulate matter (PM).

DEP Awards Port Everglades Emissions Reduction Grant

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) awarded a $750,000 grant to Broward County’s Port Everglades for diesel emissions reduction through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Clean Diesel Campaign. Funds will allow the port to retrofit, upgrade or replace diesel engines to reduce emissions. Broward County is also contributing $510,000 to emissions reduction projects at the port. The grant will fund the purchase and installation of diesel emissions reduction equipment for on-road and off-road equipment, replacement of old generators, forklifts, and service vehicles. Other port projects include diesel cargo handling equipment that will be retrofitted with newer emissions reduction technology…

Grant to Reduce Emissions at Port of Pittsburgh

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a $1,156,838 grant to the Port of Pittsburgh Commission on July 28 to oversee extensive repowering of four marine towing vessels with new, more efficient diesel engines and generators that will reduce air pollution, improve air quality and lessen overall environmental impacts. The grant was awarded under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act. “Putting clean diesel engines in these hard-working marine vessels will bring cleaner, healthier air for communities along the Port’s 200-miles of navigable waterways,” said EPA mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. EPA and the Port were joined by the Allegheny County Health Department…

New Cranes to Scale Back Massport Emissions

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding $333,185 to the Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) to help retrofit five rubber tired gantry cranes with new diesel engines that will reduce air pollution. The cranes are used to load drayage trucks at the Conley shipping terminal in Boston and reposition containers within the yard. The funding, made possible under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA), is part of nearly $28 million in grant funds being awarded by EPA nationwide for clean diesel projects in 2015, and is the only project in New England to be selected for DERA funding this year. The grant will allow Massport to replace five older, Tier III diesel engines with current EPA Tier-4F certified diesel engines.

Ingram Barge, MRCT Complete Emission Reduction Program

On September 24, officials of Ingram Barge Company and the Mississippi River Corridor – Tennessee (MRCT) announced the results of an air emissions reduction program for towboats operating on the Mississippi River. Funding for this effort was awarded to MRCT by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the Clean Diesel Emerging Technologies Program. Mississippi River Corridor – Tennessee is a non-profit organization that works on economic development and land and wildlife preservation in the six West Tennessee counties that border the Mississippi River. The diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) units were manufactured by Environmental Solutions Worldwide Inc., a retrofit technology provider. Testing of the units was performed by Emisstar, an energy and emissions consultancy.

EPA Awards Clean Diesel Grants to US Ports

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded $5 million in grant funding for clean diesel projects at U.S. ports. The selected projects in California, Oregon, New Jersey and Texas will improve the air quality for people who live and work near the ports, and reduce emissions of the greenhouse gasses that lead to climate change, EPA said. “EPA and ports have a shared interest in working together to find practical solutions to reduce pollution for the benefit of workers and communities,” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said at a conference hosted by American Association of Ports Authorities, where she announced the grant recipients.

PHA, Maersk $1.5m EPA Grant for Emissions Reduction

Photo courtesy Port of Houston

The Port of Houston Authority and Maersk Line, which partnered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the first-ever low-sulfur “fuel switch” demonstration on a container ship in the Gulf of Mexico last November, have been selected to receive a nearly $1.5m grant from the National Clean Diesel Program. Funded by the National Clean Diesel Emissions Reduction Program, the grant will pay the differential costs incurred when Maersk Line vessels switch from high-sulfur bunker fuel to lower-sulfur marine diesel while approaching Texas waters.

EPA Promotes Green Initiatives at Port of Houston

Photo: Port of Houston Authority

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visited the Port of Houston April 24 to highlight grants aimed at improving air quality. The port will receive about $900,000 in funding as part of EPA’s Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) grant program for clean diesel projects at U.S. ports. “We celebrate that the Port of Houston is growing and thriving, while still reducing pollution,” Administrator McCarthy said. “As the leading port in the nation for environmental stewardship…

Ingram Barge Co. Honored for Clean Diesel Technology

Ingram Barge Company received the Southeast Diesel Collaborative “Leadership Award” for its environmental sustainability efforts utilizing advanced clean diesel technology on towboats operating on the inland river system. Ingram was recognized as a private industry leader in the national effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. An award also went to Miami-Dade County, Florida, government in the “community leader” category. The awards were announced at the Collaborative’s sixth annual Partners Meeting involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other federal, state and local government agencies, non-profits, and industry organizations. Ingram is the largest inland marine transportation company in the U.S. moving nearly 100 million tons of cargo annually on our nation’s rivers.

MLL's Fertig takes on Bermuda Challenge

Chris Fertig of Maersk Line, Limited (MLL) is competing for the Bermuda Challenge World Record leaving on his boat, the TDI CLEAN DIESEL from Liberty Harbor Marina in New York at 9:30 a.m. on September 21, 2011. MLL's sponsorship support of the M/V TDI Clean Diesel, captained by MLL's own Fertig -- General Manager of MLL's Maritime Technical Services (MTS) business unit -- will be competing for the Bermuda Challenge World Record. Created by Boating Magazine in 1994, the Bermuda…

EPA Awards Nearly $2 Mln for Clean Repowers

Three New England projects have been awarded nearly two million dollars under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) competitive national grant competition to reduce diesel emissions. The grants, totaling $1,975,000, were made under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA). The funding will assist the Connecticut Maritime Foundation, the Massachusetts Port Authority and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority in marine vessel repowering and vehicle replacement projects. Diesel engines contribute significantly to air pollution, especially in urban areas. The fine particles in diesel exhaust pose serious health risks, including aggravated asthma and other respiratory symptoms. Children are especially vulnerable to these effects.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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