Marine Link
Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Ship Engines News

LNG as a Fuel Won't Meet Strict Carbon Regulations - analyst

File Image: A recent LNG bunkering operation in progress (CREDIT: Nauticor)

Switching to liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel ocean-going vessels may not be enough for shippers to comply with long-term emissions regulations and they will have to find additional ways of reducing emissions, JBC Energy said on Tuesday. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) on Friday reached an agreement to cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels. Shipping accounts for 2.2 percent of world CO2 emissions, according to the IMO, the United Nations agency responsible for regulating the shipping industry.

Hyundai Sets Output Record

Hyundai Heavy Industries reported that it set in December a new world record in the monthly output of large ship engines, according to a report on http://joongangdaily.joins.com. Hyundai Heavy produced 17 large ship engines capable of generating a total of 890,000 hp last month, above its previous record of 760,000 horsepower in June, the company said. (Source: http://joongangdaily.joins.com)

Daewoo To Invest In Joint Manufacturing Operation

South Korea's Daewoo Heavy Industries Co. will invest $4.5 million in a joint ship engine manufacturing operation between state-run Hanjung and Samsung Heavy Industries Co., the Ministry of Commerce, Industries and Energy said. The ministry said Daewoo Heavy will hold a 17 percent stake through its investment in the newly named HSD Engine Co. Hanjung will hold a majority 51 percent stake, and Samsung Heavy 32 percent. Hanjung and Samsung will also pay $11 million and $6.8 million, respectively along with Daewoo's investment to raise HSD's equity capital to $26.8 million from the current $4.5 million. The ministry said most of the new capital would go to facility investment and the rest to research and development.

Hyundai Sets Record for Monthly Output

Reports indicate that Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., said yesterday that it set in December a new record in the monthly output of large ship engines. Hyundai Heavy produced 17 large ship engines capable of generating a total of 890,000 horsepower last month, well above its previous record of 760,000 horsepower in June, the company said. The record is attributable to the company's expansion of its facilities, installation of new equipment and increased efforts to clinch orders, Hyundai said. December's engine output is more than three times the monthly average of 250,000 horsepower by Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Japan's industry leader, Hyundai said. Source: Hearald International Tribune

Daewoo Heavy May Join Engine Joint Venture

Daewoo Heavy Industries Co. has reportedly expressed willingness to join Korea Heavy Industries and Construction Corp. in a planned ship engine joint venture. Executives from Daewoo, Korea Heavy and Samsung Heavy Industries Co. are to meet Dec. 4 to discuss Daewoo's proposal to join the venture. Korea Heavy and Samsung have agreed to set up a 60-40 joint venture that will take over ship engine manufacturing operations of the two companies starting on Jan. 1. Daewoo Heavy officials confirmed it had expressed its intention to join the venture, but did not give more information.

Teijin SCR Helps Ships Cut NOx Emissions

Teijin Engineering Ltd. announced  its development and launch of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) denitration device for midsized ship engines to ensure compliance with the Tier III NOx (nitrogen oxides) Emissions Regulation that is slated to be enforced by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) beginning in 2016. Teijin Engineering will initially supply the device on an OEM basis in June to Niigata Power Systems Co., Ltd., an engine manufacturer and the codeveloper of the product. Going forward, Teijin Engineering plans to expand sales to other ship engine manufacturers, targeting annual sales of $25 million by 2016. The…

Dutch Treat for Cavotec Moormaster at Ferry Terminal

Moormaster at Dan Helder

Cavotec say that their first automated mooring application in the Netherlands is in place as two MoorMaster units were delivered and carefully lowered into position at Port Den Helder. The units will be used by two TESO passenger ferries on the Den Helder-Texel Island route. With a length of 130m, the ferries can hold up to 300 cars and some 1,750 passengers. The MoorMaster units will enable ships’ engines to idle during each 10-minute boarding process. Previously, the ships’ engines were used to hold the vessels in position.

Major Conference Marks Helios Final Phase

A major international conference on November 27 in Copenhagen marked the final phase of the EU-funded Helios project. Helios is a cooperation research project within the EU´s seventh Framework Program for Research and Technical Development/Transportation with MAN Diesel & Turbo acting as coordinating partner. The general objective of the project is to develop a research platform for an electronically controlled, two-stroke, low-speed, marine diesel engine that operates on the principle of the direct injection of HP Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) to meet the needs of the emerging LNG market. A large audience of 100 experts from around the…

Lukoil: Cylinder Oil to Reduce Wear, Consumption

Lukoil Marine Lubricants reports that it has expanded its sales in the 2012 business year by 74% to around $200m. Established in 2008, the subsidiary of Russian oil group Lukoil continues to grow rapidly. As for operative and technical expertise, since entering into the global lubricating oil business Lukoil has relied on its Hamburg site. “Here we are in close proximity to our customers, because Germany, and Hamburg in particular, remains one of the world’s most important shipping hubs. The combination of Russian raw materials, worldwide leading additive technology and German engineering has become a success factor for us.” To round off the connection to Hamburg, shipping line Hapag-Lloyd’s Hamburg Express also uses Lukoil products for lubrication.

Wärtsilä Donates Ship Engine to S. Africa

W20 engine handover

An important initiative by Wärtsilä to support and stimulate the maritime economy in South Africa has come to fruition with the delivery of a state-of-the-art Wärtsilä 20 engine. The engine has been donated by Wärtsilä to the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), and will be used to facilitate teaching within the University's School of Engineering. The donation is part of a long-term sponsoring partnership with NMMU and the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI).

CSIC IPO?

China Shipbuilding Industry Corp (CSIC) will reportedly seek an initial public offering (IPO) in 2007, according to a report on www.chinadaily.com.cn. CSIC is currently restructuring to merge its 16 subsidiaries to form a more integrated company. Established in 1999, CSIC owns some of China's biggest shipyards and ship engine manufacturers. (Source: www.chinadaily.com.cn)

IMO Code of Practice for Atmospheric Oil Mist Detectors

The IMO released a Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) Circular entitled Code of Practice for Atmospheric Oil Mist Detectors

Koreans Consider Marine Propulsion Consolidation

Korea Heavy Industries and Construction Corp. said Daewoo Heavy Industries has expressed willingness to join it in a planned ship engine joint venture. A spokesman for the government-run machinery manufacturer said executives from Daewoo, Korea Heavy and Samsung Heavy Industries were due to meet to discuss Daewoo's proposal to join the venture.

Cavotec to Supply Multiple AMP Systems to California Ports

The Cavotec AMP equipment being supplied under these contracts includes shore power systems built into the quayside that enable ships to connect to grid-generated electrical power safely, quickly and easily. These units will also incorporate Cavotec's innovative spring-assisted One-Hand-Lift Access Covers. "Cavotec's One-Hand-Lift Access Covers are safer than many alternatives that are currently available. Conventional systems include covers with very heavy lift weights, while Cavotec's innovative system helps to avoid operator stress and injury by reducing these lift weights to a minimum," explains Rob Thompson, Cavotec USA Inc. West Coast Manager.

Ship Engine Claims add to Volkswagen's Woes

Skaugen seeks about $50 mln from VW marine unit MAN; says MAN sold engines that underestimated fuel use. MAN also has counter-claims against Skaugen. Norwegian shipowner I.M. Skaugen has disclosed it is seeking $50 million in compensation from a marine unit of Volkswagen for rigging performance tests of ship engines produced over a decade ago. I.M. Skaugen alleges that the specifications of the six engines it bought from MAN were misleading and it is seeking compensation for higher fuel use than specified over the expected 30-year lifetimes of the engines. VW now owns 75 percent of MAN Diesel and Turbo SE, although it was not an owner of MAN when the engines were made. MAN supplied the engines to Skaugen in 2002-03 and has legal counter-claims over contracts with Skaugen.

Ship Engine Emissions Adversely Affect Macrophages

Photo:  Bluebird Marine Systems Ltd

A study conducted by Germany’s Helmholtz Zentrum München and University of Rostock found that ship emissions adversely affect the health of inhabitants of coastal regions. Since macrophages also play a key role in lung diseases such as COPD, the study is important for understanding the health risks of ship exhausts, says Science Daily. "Macrophages are known as scavenger cells of the immune system and respond more sensitively to particulate matter in the lungs than lung epithelial cells…

Wartsila Sees Low Oil Price Impacting Shipping

CEO cautious on 2015 outlook. Finnish ship engine and power plant maker Wartsila reported a smaller-than-expected quarterly profit and warned lower crude prices were likely to curb oil firms' demand for vessels. Shares in Wartsila dropped 2.1 percent to 40.15 euros by 0941 GMT after it said fourth-quarter adjusted operating profit fell 7 percent year-on-year to 196 million euros ($222 million), below analysts' mean forecast of 209 million in a Reuters poll. Chief executive Bjorn Rosengren said the market outlook was uncertain. "We are taking a cautious look forward ... With the low oil price, it's easy to anticipate that it will have some kind of effect on our offshore business," he told Reuters.

Lukoil Develops Cylinder Oil Reducing Wear and Consumption

Maritime industry lubricant specialist Lukoil Marine Lubricants Ltd. reported that it expanded sales in the 2012 business year by 74% to around $200 million. Established in 2008, the subsidiary of Russian oil group Lukoil continues to grow rapidly. As for operative and technical expertise, since entering into the global lubricating oil business Lukoil has relied on its Hamburg site. “Here we are in close proximity to our customers, because Germany, and Hamburg in particular, remains one of the world’s most important shipping hubs. The combination of Russian raw materials, worldwide leading additive technology and German engineering has become a total success factor for us.” To round off the connection to Hamburg…

Mechanical Issues Dock Alaskan Cruise

Celebrity Cruise Ship Millennium in Ketchikan, Alaska (Photo: AP)

Engine problems aboard the 294-meter Celebrity Cruises ship, Millennium, forced the cancellation of six Alaska sailings, multiple news sources reported. The Millennium was ordered to stay in port in Ketchikan, Alaska earlier this week due to complications with one of the vessel’s propulsion motors. Problems with the ship’s engine reportedly began earlier in August, forcing three days of emergency prepares in Seward, Alaska. Celebrity Cruises, owned by Royal Caribbean, has cancelled the ship’s voyages up to September 22, when the ship is slated to begin a 15-day voyage from Sand Diego, Calif.

NGO's Condemn IMO Environmental Implementation Delays

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) today decided to postpone the entry into force of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions limits for ship engines from 2016 to 2021. Environmental NGOs Transport & Environment (T&E) and Seas at Risk, founding members of the IMO observer organisation Clean Shipping Coalition, condemn IMO’s decision and now call on the EU to adopt its own NOx limits for cleaner air. The decision taken at a meeting in London of the IMO working group reviewing MARPOL Annex VI [1], adopted in 2008, delays the introduction of stricter NOx emissions limits for engines of ships built from 2016 when sailing in so-called ‘NOx Emissions Control Areas’. Currently the North American coastline is such an area, and the Baltic Sea might be designated to be one.

IMO Reaches Deal to Cut CO2 Emissions

© Kara  / Adobe Stock

The United Nations shipping agency reached an agreement on Friday to cut carbon emissions, following years of slow progress. The compromise plan, which will cut emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels, fell short of more ambitious targets. Kitack Lim, Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), said the adoption of the strategy "would allow future IMO work on climate change to be rooted in a solid basis". The IMO said it would also be pursuing efforts towards phasing out CO2 emissions entirely.

Australia: Casualty Resulted from Poor Planning and Maintenance

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) issued the report of its investigation into the foundering of the cargo ship Tycoon at Christmas Island on January 8, 2012.   Heavy weather arose while the ship was in position at the inner moorings at Flying Fish Cove. Under the stress of weather, one of the port’s permanent mooring lines came free from its anchor, allowing the ship to move forward, making contact with the terminal’s rock face.   The master did not immediately notify the port of the problem or make proper use of the ship’s engines or mooring lines to keep the ship safe. The ship eventually broke up and sank. The port managers had not undertaken a risk assessment and had not implemented an effective inspection and maintenance program. http://brymar-consulting.com

NASSCO Gets $60M for 3rd MLP Long-Lead Materials

General Dynamics NASSCO announced it has received a $60m contract from the U.S. Navy to purchase long-lead materials for the construction of a third Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) ship. NASSCO is already under contract to build two MLP ships. With this new contract, NASSCO will place orders for the ship’s engines and other components that have significant manufacturing lead times. A contract that fully funds construction of the third MLP ship is expected to be awarded by early next year. General Dynamics NASSCO is a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD). The MLP is a new class of auxiliary ship for the Navy. Once delivered, MLP ships will join the three Maritime Prepositioning Force squadrons that are strategically located around the world to enable rapid response in a crisis.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Apr 2018 - Offshore Energy Annual

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