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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Uss Independence News

USS Independence on Time & on Course

USS Independence tow position (Photo: EMR Group)

The decommissioned aircraft carrier, USS Independence has just passed by Costa Rica on its final mission, from Bremerton and onward to Brownsville, Texas. This is the first leg of a long 16,000 mile journey that will take the 60,000-ton super carrier around the tip of South America, transiting the Strait of Magellan and eventually into EMR Group’s International Shipbreaking Ltd. yard in Brownsville, Texas. USS Independence left on her final journey on Saturday, March 11th from the Kitsap Naval Base in Bremerton, Washington to Brownsville, Texas and is expected to take just under three months.

Today in U.S. Naval History: December 4

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67). (USN Photo DN-ST-89-01287 by Photographer’s Mate 2d Class William Lipski)

Today in U.S. 1918 - President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 - Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others, while only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 - USS Flasher (SS-249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami and damages a merchant ship in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. submarine to sink over 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 - Launch of Gemini seven piloted by CDR James A. Lovell, USN.

This Day in Naval History – Dec. 4

1918 - President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 - Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others, while only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 - USS Flasher (SS-249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami and damages a merchant ship in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. submarine to sink over 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 - Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by CDR James A. Lovell, USN. This flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km and lasted 13 days and 18 hours. 1983 - Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft positions in Lebanon that fired on U.S.

This Day in Naval History – Dec. 4

1918 - President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 - Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damaging five others, while only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 - USS Flasher (SS-249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami and damages a merchant ship in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. submarine to sink over 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 - Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by CDR James A. Lovell, USN. This flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km and lasted 13 days and 18 hours. 1983 - Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft positions in Lebanon that fired on U.S.

Photo: USS Independence Builder’s Sea Trials

The Navy's first trimaran Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Independence (LCS 2), during Builder's Sea Trials in the Gulf of Mexico July 2009.

First Foreign Visit for a Littoral Combat Ship

USS Independence: Photo credit USN

The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) has left Manzanillo, Mexico, concluding the ship's first foreign port visit since its commissioning. Independence and embarked Mine Countermeasures Detachment One sailors visited Mexico while on the ship's maiden voyage to its homeport of San Diego, marking the first foreign port visit by any Independence-class ship. While in port, Independence sailors volunteered at a community service project at a local orphanage and participated in various Morale…

First Austal LCS Joins U.S. Navy Fleet

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

Austal-designed and built Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Independence has officially joined the operating forces of the United States Navy following a commissioning ceremony held near Austal’s Mobile, Ala. facility. Thousands of Navy officials, politicians, industry delegates and spectators joined in welcoming USS Independence into the U.S. Navy fleet, where it will serve as a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments. The ship is designed to defeat asymmetric "anti-access" threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

This Day in Naval History – Oct. 20

1824 - U.S. Schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 - Seventh Fleet lands over 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 - Task Force 77 establishes ECM Hunter/Killer Teams of 2 ECM equipped aircraft and an armed escort of 4 Skyraiders and 4 Corsairs. 1967 - Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 - Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV-59 ) ordered to Grenada. (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – October 20

1824 - U.S. Schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 - Seventh Fleet lands over 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 - Task Force 77 establishes ECM Hunter/Killer Teams of 2 ECM equipped aircraft and an armed escort of 4 Skyraiders and 4 Corsairs. 1967 - Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 - Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV-59 ) ordered to Grenada. (Source: Navy News Service)

LCS 'Independence' Greeted at New Home Port

Photo credit USN

LCS Independence arrives at its new home port led through San Diego Bay by a water-spraying tugboat. Independence, the lead ship in the trimaran hull-variant, is the second vessel in the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship program. It’s also the second LCS to arrive at Naval Base San Diego, where the Navy plans to base its future fleet of 55 ships. The first littoral combat ship, Freedom, arrived in San Diego in 2010. Independence left Mayport, Fla., in early April, traveling through the Panama Canal with a stop in Manzanillo…

Navy Accepts Delivery of USS Gabrielle Giffords

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Gabby Giffords waves to a crowd in front of the littoral combat ship, USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), named for her. Giffords was on the stage as Dr. Jill Biden christened the ship at Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. The 419-foot ship was built at the Austal shipyard and is the Navy's 10th littoral combat ship designed to operate in shallow waters near the coast. It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person.

The Navy accepted delivery of the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) during a ceremony, Dec. 23. Gabrielle Giffords is the ninth littoral combat ship (LCS) to be delivered to the Navy and the fifth of the Independence variant to join the fleet. The Independence variant is noted for its unique trimaran hull, ability to operate at high speeds and large flight deck size. "We are pleased to receive the future USS Gabrielle Giffords into the LCS class," said Capt. Harrison, commander, LCS Squadron (COMLCSRON) 1.

Saab Sea Giraffe Naval Radar

Cmdr. Dave Back (right), executive officer of USS Independence (LCS 2) Gold Crew, conducts a tour of his ship to attendees of the Sea Giraffe Users Group at Naval Base San Diego.  He is seen here showing the ship’s spacious mission bay to Cam Fung from Canada (left), and Capt. Charlie Songsawangthus and Cmdr. Sarawoot Chiyangcabut from Thailand. (Photo by Papola Kani, Consulate of Sweden, San Diego)

Users of the Saab Sea Giraffe naval radar are meeting this week in San Diego to share their experiences with the operation and support of the Sea Giraffe family of naval surveillance radars. The radar is well suited for small combatants, and has been installed aboard corvettes and frigates, patrol boats, and the littoral combat ship, and is in service or selected for installation with 12 navies around the world. Sea Giraffe provides the volume search radar for USS Independence (LCS 2)…

GD Bath Ironworks Awarded 'USS Independence' Contract

USS Independence: Photo credit Wiki CCL

Among the latest US Department of Defense, Navy contracts, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is being awarded a $7,526,038 cost-plus-award-fee modificationc for work on Littoral Combat Ship 'USS Independence'. The contract announced is additional to the previously awarded task order under a Basic Ordering Agreement (N00024-09-G-2301 ER09) to provide engineering and management services for advance planning and design in support of the post-shakedown availability for the USS Independence (LCS 2).

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 6

Grace Hopper (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, NHHC.)

Today in U.S. 1918 - Sailors fire first of the five railroad batteries at Tergnier, a German rail head in the Comeigne Forest. These 14"-50 caliber guns were originally designed for battleships. 1940 - First destroyers transferred to Great Britain at Halifax, Nova Scotia, under "Destroyers-for- Bases" agreement. 1944 - USS Independence (CVL-22) begins use of specially trained air group for night work. First time that a fully equipped night carrier operates with fast carrier task force. 1945 - U.S. troops begin returning to U.S. when Task Force 11 left Tokyo Bay for U.S.

GE Gas Turbines Power LCS USS Coronado

Photo: GE Marine

Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) was commissioned by the United States Navy on April 5 at its home port of San Diego, California. GE Marine reported that this Independence-variant LCS is powered by two GE LM2500 marine gas turbines. Named for the California city of Coronado, LCS 4 is the third Navy ship to bear the name of the "Crown City." The first USS Coronado (PF 38), a patrol frigate, served as a convoy escort during World War II. The second USS Coronado (AGF 11)…

Austal Celebrates Christening Of Future USS Tulsa

Ship’s sponsor, Mrs Kathy Taylor, former Mayor and current Chief of Economic Development for the City of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was joined by Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle and officers from the US Navy for the christening of the future USS Tulsa at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on 11 February 2017. (Photo: Austal)

Austal Limited has announced that Austal USA has hosted the christening of the future USS Tulsa, the 8th Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) designed and constructed for the United States Navy (USN). Former Mayor of Tulsa and current Chief of Economic Development for the Oklahoma city, Mrs Kathy Taylor formally christened USS Tulsa at a formal ceremony held at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. In addition to the USS Independence (LCS 2) and Coronado (LCS 4), Austal USA is delivering 11 Independence variant LCS to the USN, under a contract valued at approximately US$4 billion.

USS Gabrielle Giffords Completes Acceptance Trials

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Gabby Giffords waves to a crowd in front of the littoral combat ship, USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), named for her. Giffords was on the stage as Dr. Jill Biden christened the ship at Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. The 419-foot ship was built at the Austal shipyard and is the Navy's 10th littoral combat ship designed to operate in shallow waters near the coast. It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person.

Future Independence-class littoral combat ship USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) successfully completed its acceptance trials Nov. 18. The trials consisted of a series of in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). Acceptance trials are the last significant milestone before delivery of the ship to the Navy. During the trials, the Navy conducted comprehensive tests of the LCS intended to demonstrate the performance of the propulsion plant, ship handling, and auxiliary systems.

Navy's Latest LCS Comes Up to the Mark on Acceptance Trials

LCS 4 on sea trials: Photo credit USN

Rear Adm. Jim Murdoch, 
Program Executive Officer for Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) comments on the recent sea trial of the future 'USS Coronado', which as with all new construction ships in the Navy was conducted by the Board of Inspection and Survey. This was INSURV’s second acceptance trials of an Independence-variant littoral combat ship. Key at-sea demonstrations included main propulsion full power, steering, anchoring, launch and recovery operations with both the 7- and 11-meter rigid hull inflatable boats, and surface detect-to-engage demonstrations.

'Amazingly Intact' WWII-era Aircraft Carrier Surveyed

Features on a photo of USS Independence CVL 22 are captured in a 3D low-resolution sonar image of the shipwreck in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The Coda Octopus Echoscope 3D sonar, integrated on the Boeing AUV Echo Ranger, imaged the shipwreck during the first maritime archaeological survey. The sonar image with oranges color tones (lower) shows an outline of a possible airplane in the forward aircraft elevator hatch opening. (Credit: NOAA, Boeing, and Coda Octopus)

NOAA, working with private industry partners and the U.S. Navy, has confirmed the location and condition of the USS Independence, the lead ship of its class of light aircraft carriers that were critical during the American naval offensive in the Pacific during World War II. Resting in 2,600 feet of water off California's Farallon Islands, the carrier is "amazingly intact," said NOAA scientists, with its hull and flight deck clearly visible, and what appears to be a plane in the carrier's hangar bay.

Future USS Omaha Passes Acceptance Trials

File photo: USS Tulsa (LCS 16) is heading back to Austal USA after launching from the drydock at BAE Ship Systems in March 2016. She's passing Austal's vessel completion yard where USNS Yuma (EPF 8), USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and future USS Omaha (LCS 12) are docked. (Photo: Austal USA)

The future USS Omaha (LCS 12) has completed its final significant milestone before delivery to the U.S. Navy, having passed its acceptance trials May 12 after completing a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). During the trial, the Navy demonstrated the performance of the propulsion plant, ship handling and auxiliary systems via a series of comprehensive tests. While underway, Omaha performed launch and recovery operations of the 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boat…

Navy Names Austal’s Next Two Littoral Combat Ships

Austal hosted a visit by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus on Friday, March 25. He was joined by U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions, Congressman Jo Bonner, Austal USA President and Chief Operating Officer, Joe Rella, and Mobile Mayor Sam Jones in formally announcing the names that he has selected for the first two Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) of the recently awarded 10-ship contract to Austal. LCS 6 will be named USS Jackson and LCS 8 will be named USS Montgomery. Secretary Mabus announced the names during his meeting with approximately 600 Austal production employees…

Independence Begins Maiden Voyage

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

The Navy's newest littoral combat ship, USS Independence (LCS 2), sailed away from Mobile, Ala. for the first time March 26. The milestone marks the commencement of initial testing and evaluation of the aluminum vessel. "We are excited to set sail, and remain grateful for the incredible support offered by the city of Mobile in helping us reach this milestone," said Cmdr. Curt Renshaw, Independence Blue Crew commanding officer. Independence's maiden voyage will include stops in Key West and Mayport, Fla., before pulling into Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

This Day in Naval History

1918 - Sailors fire first of the five railroad batteries at Tergnier, a German rail head in the Comeigne Forest. These 14-inch, 50-caliber guns were originally designed for battleships. 1939 - Navy begins formation of neutrality patrol for Atlantic Ocean. 1940 - First destroyers transferred to Great Britain at Halifax, Nova Scotia, under "Destroyers for Bases" agreement. 1944 - USS Independence (CVL 22) begins use of specially trained air group for night work. First time a fully-equipped night carrier operates with fast carrier task force. 1945 - U.S. troops begin returning home when Task Force 11 left Tokyo Bay for the United States. 1953 - Exchange of prisoners of war from Korean War (Operation Big Switch) ends.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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