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Monday, October 15, 2018

Aegis News

Construction Milestone for DDG 51 Program

Rendering  of the future Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), the first “Flight III” ship in the U.S. Navy’s Arleigh Burke class of destroyers (Image: HII)

The U.S. Navy's Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) destroyers program notched two shipbuilding milestones with the recent start of construction at shipyards Bath Iron Works (BIW) in Bath, Maine, and Huntington Ingalls Industries in Pascagoula, Miss.Construction of the future USS Harvey C. Barnum Jr. (DDG 124) officially began on May 17 at BIW, where the ship's namesake, Col. Harvey "Barney" Barnum, Jr. (Ret.), was on hand to mark the start of fabrication on the ship.In Pascagoula, construction of the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) officially began May 7.

Keel Laid for Future USS Daniel Inouye

Irene Hirano Inouye, wife of the late senator and World War II Medal of Honor recipient Daniel Inouye (Photo: General Dynamics Bath Iron Works)

On Monday, May 14, shipbuilder General Dynamics Bath Iron Works held a keel laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy’s future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG 118). The $642.5 million Arleigh Burke-class destroyer DDG 118 has been under construction since October 2014 and is now over half completed. The 3,000-ton keel unit was moved onto the building ways from the Maine shipyard’s Ultra Hall earlier this year, signifying the start of hull integration and the precursor to integration, test and trials. The U.S. Navy named the ship in honor of Sen.

BAE Systems Wins $146.3 Mln US Navy Contract

USS Gettysburg (CG 64) (Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems said it has been awarded a $146.3 million contract from the U.S. Navy to modernize the USS Gettysburg (CG 64).The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser will undergo about 15 months of work at the company’s shipyard in Norfolk, Va., the ship’s homeport. The contract includes options that, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value to $151.3 million.Starting in January 2019, the Gettysburg will undergo extensive repair and upgrade work that will return the ship to full capability after nearly four years of inactive status under the Navy’s cruiser modernization program.

BAE Systems Delivers ‘Friend-or-Foe’ Antenna to US Navy

(Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems announced it has delivered its 150th OE-120 Identification Friend-or-Foe (IFF) antenna to the U.S. Navy. The antenna is used by sailors to identify friendly aircraft and vessels, and supports shipboard air traffic management systems for both IFF and secondary surveillance radars. It is currently on about 150 U.S. and allied ships worldwide, from frigates to aircraft carriers.Originally designed to support the Aegis Combat System, the OE-120 antenna is the only electronically scanned IFF antenna used by the U.S. Navy.

Keel Laid for USS Frank E. Petersen

Photo: United States Navy

The keel of future guided-missile destroyer USS Frank E. Petersen, Jr. (DDG 121) was ceremoniously laid Feb. 21 at Huntington Ingalls Industries shipyard. Although official construction of DDG 121 began April 2016, the keel laying symbolically recognizes the ceremonial beginning of the ship. The keel was said to be "fairly and truly laid" and was authenticated by D'Arcy Neller, the ship's sponsor, and Donald Brabston, a master Ingalls shipbuilder. "The keel laying is the symbolic first step in shaping our nation's newest destroyer," said Capt.

Cristobal Colon Arrives in Sydney

ESPS Christobal Colon of the Spanish Amarda arrives in Sydney Harbour. The crew of ESPS Christobal Colon will be helping to train and familiarise crew's of Australia's Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

HMA Ships Darwin, Melbourne and Parramatta have escorted the Spanish Armada's Cristobal Colon into Sydney Harbour as part of her role in providing platform and familiarisation training to Australian personnel. Over the next three months the ship will assist in enabling Australian Navy people to have advance training for Australia's first Aegis Guided Missile Destroyer, Hobart. Commanding Officer Hobart Captain John Stavridis said the opportunity to embark in Cristobal Colon presented…

India, Indonesia Commence Co-ordinated Patrol

Photo:  Indian Navy

The 29th series of India–Indonesia CORPAT is scheduled from 09 – 25 May 2017 with the opening ceremony being conducted from 09 -12 May 2017 at Port Blair under the aegis of Andaman and Nicobar Command. The Indonesian Naval Ship KRI Sutedi Senoputra has arrived at Haddo Wharf, Port Blair to mark the commencement of the 29th series of IND–INDO CORPAT today. An Indonesian Maritime Patrol Aircraft also flew in with the Indonesian Naval delegation led by First Admiral Bambang Irwanto to INS Utkrosh, Port Blair.

India's Sagarmala Moves to Implementation Stage

Image: Ministry of Shipping, India

The flagship programme of Indian Ministry of Shipping – Sagarmala, has moved from the conceptualization and planning to the implementation stage. The Sagarmala project is introduces to harness India's 7,500-km coastline will promote port-led development in the country. As a part of the programme, more than 400 projects have been identified across the areas of port modernization and new port development, connectivity enhancement, portlinked industrialization and coastal community development.

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

US Navy Orders First ‘Flight III’ Destroyer

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division will build Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), the first “Flight III” ship in the U.S. Navy’s Arleigh Burke class of destroyers. (HII rendering)

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) said its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a contract modification to incorporate the “Flight III” upgrades to the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). The ship is the fifth of five destroyers the company was originally awarded in June 2013. “We have proven our success in the DDG 51 class over the past 30 years, and our shipbuilders are ready now to build the first Flight III ship,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. “This will be the 35th Aegis destroyer we will build for the U.S.

New US Navy Destroyer Passes Builders Trials

Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder's sea trials for Ralph Johnson (DDG 114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems. (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

The U.S. Navy’s newest guided missile destroyer Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) has successfully passed builder’s sea trials. The Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico, as Huntington Ingalls Industries' (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division tested the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems. “It’s always a great accomplishment when our shipbuilders successfully take a ship to sea for the first time,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said.

Balancing Efficiency & Security as Maritime Goes Digital

In December 2004, Crew members assigned to the guided missile cruiser USS Yorktown (CG 48) man the rails for the final time in preparation of the order to de-man the ship as she is decommissioned on board Naval Station Pascagoula, Miss. In 1996, the Yorktown was selected to be the testbed for Navy’s Smart Ship program, effectively exposing a major flaw in the system when a simple error left the ship blacked out for hours. (U.S. Navy photo by Stacey Byington)

Hand in hand with the digital craze in maritime is the caution of cyber attacks. We live and operate in a complex society. That society would be impossible without modern computers and other information technologies Those technologies have largely been developed piecemeal to address particular issues, and for the most part they have generally achieved their particular goals. Maximum efficiency is gained when multiple technologies are joined to coordinate their work. Computers get smaller and faster, with ever-growing memory. Joining computers together allowed for creation of the internet.

MHS Seminar on Indian Maritime Wisdom

Photo: Indian Navy

The Maritime History Society (MHS) under the aegis of the Western Naval Command, is being organised an intellectually stimulating two day seminar on the theme, “Indian Maritime Wisdom” on 05 & 06 October 2017. This seminar is the Thirty- Eighth edition of a long running series that began in 1980 and the inaugural session was held at the INHS Asvini Auditorium, Near RC Church, Colaba in South Mumbai on 05 October 2017. The Chairman of MHS, Vice Admiral Girish Luthra, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief…

US Navy to Christen Delbert D Black Today

Photo: US Navy

The Navy will christen the newest guided-missile destroyer, the future USS Delbert D. Black (DDG 119), Saturday, Nov. 4, during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Industries Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The future USS Delbert D. Black is the first ship to bear the name of a master chief petty officer of the Navy (MCPON) and is named for the first person to hold that office. Black began his 30-year Navy career in the spring of 1941. After completing recruit training…

US Navy Accepts Delivery of Future USS Ralph Johnson

Photo: United States Navy

The Navy accepted delivery of future guided-missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) from shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Nov. 15. In early September, DDG 114 successfully demonstrated its ship's systems and readiness during a series of at sea and in-port trials for the U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). Due to the success of the trials, INSURV recommended the ship be accepted for delivery to the U.S. Navy. "The namesake of this ship is a true American patriot who sacrificed his life for the safety of his fellow Marines and his country," said Capt.

BAE Systems Wins US Navy Modernization Work

USS Oscar Austin (Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems said it has received contracts from the U.S. Navy for the modernization of guided missile destroyers USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and USS Howard (DDG 83), valued at $41.6 million  and $47.8 million respectively. Oscar Austin will undergo 12 months of work at the company’s shipyard in Norfolk, Va., the ship’s homeport. The contract includes options that, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value to $117.1 million. Under the depot maintenance period (DMP) contract…

US Navy: 355-Ship Fleet is the Mandate, Funding It is Fuzzy

(U.S. Navy photo by Morgan K. Nall)

As Congress wrestles with the budget, there is at least a bipartisan consensus that defense spending should grow, and that includes growing the Navy’s fleet. The current goal is 355 ships, an admirable goal, but an objective that faces many cost hurdles. The surface fleet (which excludes submarines and aircraft carriers) needs to grow in capability and capacity. The numbers of ships being procured or envisions would increase as the total n umber of ships increases, but the number in this story represents current program status.

SCI Takes Over Consultancy of MV "Andaman"

Logo

The Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) has taken over the Technical Consultancy of MV “Andaman”, a 35 Ton Bollard Pull Tug owned by M/s. ALHW (Andaman Lakshadweep Harbour Works) Port Blair, an organization under the aegis of Ministry of Shipping. M/s. ALHW has accepted the delivery of MV “Andaman” on 9th November, 2016 at Port Blair. MV “Andaman” has been constructed under the supervision of the SCI complying with the latest applicable regulations. It is the first of the series of the two 35 Ton BP Tugs ordered by ALHW in May 2015 and built at M/s. Tebma Shipyards Limited.

DON Recognizes Acquisition Excellence

Capt. Michael C. Ladner receives the Program Manager of the Year award at the Department of the Navy Acquisition Excellence Awards ceremony at the Pentagon. The annual acquisition awards recognize individuals and teams for executing creative, effective and cost-saving acquisition practices. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jason BehnkeReleased)

The Department of the Navy recognized more than 50 acquisition professionals for exceptional efforts in the acquisition field during a Pentagon ceremony Nov. 17. Hosted by Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) Sean Stackley, the 2016 Acquisition Excellence Awards celebrated individuals and teams for upholding key tenets of acquisition including competition, affordability, technical expertise, innovative techniques and professional acumen. "Today…

General Dynamics wins U.S. Navy Design Deal

The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, a subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), a $59 million contract for the continuation of Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) Lead Yard Services and Flight III Upgrade design efforts. This contract extends the services for engineering, technical support, special studies and Flight III design work for Arleigh Burke-class ships through December 2017. The Flight III upgrades include a more powerful missile defense radar, increased shipboard power production and hull enhancements. More than 200 highly skilled engineers, designers and planners work on this contract. Since 1987, Bath Iron Works has provided design and technical assistance for design upgrades and major changes for DDG 51-class destroyers.

$59 mln US Navy Contract for General Dynamics

Courtesy General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, a subsidiary of General Dynamics, a $59 million contract for the continuation of Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) Lead Yard Services and Flight III Upgrade design efforts. This contract extends the services for engineering, technical support, special studies and Flight III design work for Arleigh Burke-class ships through December 2017. The Flight III upgrades include a more powerful missile defense radar, increased shipboard power production and hull enhancements.

US Navy Destroyer John Finn Delivered

Ingalls Shipbuilding's 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII)

The U.S. Navy has accepted delivery of future guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG 113) from shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) on December 7, the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer DDG 113 after completing three sets of at-sea and in-port trials which proved the ship's operational readiness. The ship is the 63rd DDG 51-class destroyer and the first of the DDG 51 Flight IIA restart ships.

USS Rafael Peralta Completes Acceptance Trials

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115) sets sail on October 17, 2016 for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder's trials off the coast of Maine. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115) successfully completed acceptance trials Dec. 16 after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine. The U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations while underway. INSURV evaluates the ship's construction and compliance with Navy specifications and is the governing body that recommends the ship be delivered to the Navy. The trials were conducted both pier-side and underway.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2018 - Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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