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Friday, December 14, 2018

Dakota Creek Industries News

US Navy Orders Four New Tugs

(Photo: Brian Gauvin / Robert Allan Ltd.)

The U.S. Navy has ordered four new tugs from Anacortes, Wash. shipbuilder Dakota Creek Industries Inc., with options for two additional vessels. Construction of the series′ first vessel is expected to begin in early in 2019.The vessels will be a new version of the Robert Allan Ltd. designed Z-Tech 4500 tugs. The Navy already has six vessels of this design, known as the YT 802 Class, in service. This first group were delivered between 2010-2012 and are in use in the Pacific Northwest and Japanese waters.The new tugs will perform ship-handling duties for the full range of U.S.

PPG, MTU Power Bay Area's New Ferries

(Image: Pacific Power Group)

San Francisco Bay Area ferry operator Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) is expanding its fleet with new vessels in order to meet large ridership increases. By 2035, WETA expects to add a total of 44 new vessels to meet anticipated demand, which is expected to increase by as much as 900 percent.As part of its larger fleet expansion strategy, WETA currently has three new ferries on order at the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. that are due to enter service next year.

EPA Tier 4 Propulsion for New San Francisco Ferries

(Photo: MTU)

Rolls-Royce said it has won an order to deliver its first EPA Tier 4-compliant propulsion systems from MTU to WETA (Water Emergency Transportation Authority) for installation in three brand-new catamaran ferries. The first of the three high-speed ferries is expected to enter service on the San Francisco Bay in late 2018. The San Francisco Bay is subject to special environmental protection. “Our goal is to operate a ferry service that is sustainable, cost-efficient and eco-friendly,” said Nina Rannells, WETA Executive Director.

MARAD Awards $9.8 Mln to US Shipyards

© wi6995 / Adobe Stock

Aiming to support shipbuilding modernizations that will increase productivity and allow U.S. shipyards to compete more effectively in global markets, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) has awarded $9.8 million to 18 U.S. yards through its Small Shipyard Grant Program. “Small shipyards play a significant role in our country’s maritime sector, which contributes to our economy, security, and infrastructure,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

The Evolving ATB Jones Act Business Model

ATB Corpus Christi/Petrochem Supplier (Image Credit: US Shipping Corp)

Today’s ATB play seemingly has legs for the long haul, as operators build and market needs fluctuate. The refined product trades are always in flux. Similarly, the supply patterns for products (and for chemicals derived from oil refining) are subject to constant change. At the same time, the distribution of refined petroleum products sees great benefit from the efficiency of Articulated Tug Barges (ATBs), which have the flexibility to adjust to dynamic supply programs between refineries and myriad distribution facilities dotting the coastline. It wasn’t always like that.

North American Ferries: Faster, Greener & Safer

(Photo: BC Ferries)

Domestic ferries adjust their business models to met regulatory pressures and exceed environmental standards with an eye towards improved service. And, not a minute too soon. In North America, stalwarts in the ferry business continue to shorten journey times compared to surface alternatives, while at the same time, bring accessibility to barrier and coastal islands that would otherwise be impossible to reach. Established stakeholders continually fine-tune their operations in a…

A Time to Build & Refit

Bulbous and New: The Ocean Peace post-conversion. (Photo: Vigor)

The aging Pacific Northwest fishing fleet is either undergoing or about to undergo a long-overdo upgrade, judging by a major economic report commissioned by the Port of Seattle. Fisheries managers, seafood suppliers, yards and the supply chain all hope an accompanying surge in ship finance “lifts all boats”. For now, the newbuild count is growing apace, slowed just a bit by owners opting for major retrofits amid rich fish harvests. This fisheries upsurge comes with some rising stars of ship design-and-build for vessels set to ply the Bering and Beaufort seas.

New Vessel Aims to Transform the Fishing Industry

Photo: Blue North

Seattle-based company Blue North has christened F/V Blue North, a state-of-the-art vessel designed to transform the fishing industry by improving conditions for workers, reducing environmental impact and harvesting seafood more humanely. Designed with sustainability in mind, the new longliner is geared specifically for the Alaskan cod fishery, built by Dakota Creek Industries, Inc. of Anacortes, Wash. from a design (ST-155L) by Norwegian firm Skipsteknisk AS. The new fish harvesting vessel…

Research Vessel Neil Armstrong Joins WHOI Fleet

R/V Neil Armstrong sails into San Francisco Harbor at the conclusion of the first leg of its inaugural voyage in late 2015. (Image by Aerial Productions, ©Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

I woke up the first night out of Anacortes, Washington, when the ship dropped out from under me and I levitated off my bunk. Then came the sound of shuffleboard in the conference room one deck above. The only trouble was, there's no shuffleboard on the research vessel Neil Armstrong. It was Halloween 2015 in the Northeast Pacific. We were in the first hours of the first voyage of the newest ship in the U.S. academic research fleet, and we were already plowing through 15-foot waves. But the ship’s motion made it feel more like we were facing much heavier seas.

RV Sally Ride Completes Builder's Trials

R/V Sally Ride (AGOR 28) is prepared for a christening ceremony at Dakota Creek Industries, Inc. shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. R/V Sally Ride is the second in the Neil Armstrong-class of research vessels and features a modern suite of oceanographic and acoustic ocean mapping equipment. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

The U.S. Navy's new Auxiliary General Purpose Oceanographic Research Vessel (AGOR), R/V Sally Ride (AGOR 28), has completed builder's trials, February 21, off the coast of Anacortes, Wash. Builder's trials for Sally Ride tested various shipboard systems and ensured readiness prior to conducting acceptance trials with the U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey. The propulsion system, mission-over-the-side handling equipment, anchor handling system and work/rescue boat launch system were among the systems successfully demonstrated.

The New Standard in Transportation and Propulsion

Cargo vessel Coastal Standard (Photo: Coastal Transportation)

The latest addition to the Coastal Transportation fleet, MV Coastal Standard, was built at Dakota Creek Industries Shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. with a design developed to maximize cargo carrying capacity while minimizing construction and operating costs, according to the shipbuilder. With help from its SCHOTTEL propulsion system, the vessel also scores high marks in safety, maneuverability and operability. The vessel’s owner, Seattle-based Coastal Transportation, owns and operates a fleet of cargo vessels sailing from Seattle to ports throughout Western Alaska and the Aleutian Islands…

Optimarin Breaks into the Fishing Market

Americas Finest (Image: Optimarin)

Ballast water treatment (BWT) specialist Optimarin has landed its first ever contract in the fishing segment. The Norwegian firm will now supply its soon to be USCG approved Optimarin Ballast System (OBS) for the Skipsteknisk-designed America’s Finest. Seattle-based Fisherman’s Finest will own and operate the 80-meter-long stern trawler, which is currently being completed at Washington’s Dakota Creek Industries yard. America’s Finest, a ST-116XL design, has been hailed as Skipsteknisk’s most environmentally friendly vessel to date.

Crowley Tug Sold to Island Tug & Barge

Photo: Marcon International

Crowley Marine Services, Inc. has sold a second sister-tug of the Point Class to Island Tug & Barge Co., Marcon International, Inc. reported. The sale of the ABS +A1, Towing, +AMS classed, 2,100BHP shallow draft ocean towing / push tug Pt. Oliktok mirrors the transaction which Marcon brokered in 2013 between the two parties on the sister vessel ex-Pt. Barrow. The three Point Class sister-tugs were specifically designed and built to work in the Arctic, where Crowley needed vessels…

Coatings Quietly Helping to Control Noise

U.S. Navy’s AGOR Research Vessels are built to be as operationally quiet as possible. That’s where Mascoat’s Sound Control-dB coatings come in. When the U.S. Navy began its design and build program for its newest generation of research vessels, it specified that the vessels had to be as quiet as possible. That’s because a large part of ocean research involves listening and excessive ship noise tends to negate that effort. Achieving the goal of an exceptionally quiet vessel, the vessel’s design team employed a variety of methods to meet the Navy’s exacting standards…

Great Ships of 2014: R/V Neil Armstrong - Multifaceted Sea Explorer

 Two ships, $145m GPA designed Diesel Electric propulsion

The Ocean Class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) vessel hull number 27 started its official life as the R/V Neil Armstrong, the first research vessel named after a space explorer. The ship was designed by Guido Perla and Associates and built at Dakota Creek Industries (DCI). R/V Neil Armstrong will replace the R/V Knorr, in service since 1968, one year before Armstrong’s walk on the moon. The R/V Knorr, AGOR-15, is retiring after logging over one million miles in service to the Navy and WHOI.

US Orders Trawler with Common-Rail Technology

Graphical rendering of the ST-116 XL design for ‘America’s Finest’ (courtesy Skipsteknisk)

MAN Diesel & Turbo has received an order for an MAN 8L32/44CR engine to power a newbuilding trawler for Fishermen’s Finest, the U.S. fishing concern. The 32/44CR engine order is significant on two counts in that it represents the first CR engine sold to the American fishing segment that is fully U.S. EPA Tier II-compliant and is, simultaneously, a first reference for MAN Diesel & Turbo in the important, domestic fishing industry. Robert Burger, Managing Director – MAN Diesel & Turbo, USA, said, “Fishermen’s Finest aims to be a leader in the competitive U.S.

Markey Equips Research Vessel Sally Ride

Research Vessel Sally Ride (Photo courtesy of Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Named for the first American woman launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger, the Research Vessel Sally Ride was commissioned August 9 at Dakota Creek Industries (Anacortes, Washington). Sally Ride is a U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research sponsored Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research Vessel (AGOR-28). The vessel’s advanced deck machinery will be operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography personnel during extended scientific missions upon the seven seas.

Oceanographic R/V 'Sally Ride' Christened

Christening 'Sally Ride': Photo USN

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus named the 'R/V Sally Ride' to honor the memory of Sally Ride, a scientist, innovator and educator. Ride was the first American woman and the youngest person in space. She later served as director of NASA’s Office of Exploration as well as the California Space Institute at University of California San Diego. “The christening of this ship is not only a celebration of the hard work and dedication of the men and women who have brought this vessel from an idea to a reality…

Demand for Coastal and Transoceanic ATBs Grows

Along the way, ATBs gain speed, efficiency, safety – and popularity. Operators of articulated tugs and barges, or ATBs, say they like the maneuverability, weather reliability, stability, speed of these units, and the manner in which the tug pushes the barge. As a marine transportation concept, they can also simply be described as versatile. ATBs move petroleum, chemicals, coal, grain, containerized cargo and rail cars for customers on the U.S. coasts, rivers, the Great Lakes and overseas. As a result, demand for articulated units expanded in the last two decades with new technology.

U.S. Navy's AGOR 27: R/V Neil Armstrong

The ship as it was moved into the water at Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Washington. (Photo courtesy of Gary McGrath, WHOI)

On March 29, the Ocean Class Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) vessel hull number 27 started its official life as the R/V Neil Armstrong, the first research vessel named after a space explorer. Carol Armstrong, the widow of the famed astronaut, performed the christening duties during a brief sunbreak on a windy and rainy Pacific Northwest afternoon. The number of illustrious speakers highlighted the rich diversity of agencies involved in the design, construction and operation of the vessel.

Navy Research Vessel Neil Armstrong Christened

Carol Armstrong, ship sponsor for R/V Neil Armstrong, breaking the bottle across the bow.

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering company Guido Perla & Associates, Inc. (GPA) announced that the christening ceremony for the Oceanographic Research Vessel AGOR 27, named in honor of the famed Neil Armstrong, was held at Dakota Creek Industries (DCI) in Anacortes, Wash., on March 29, 2014. Kali Armstrong, granddaughter of the late astronaut and the Maid of Honor, sang the National Anthem and Carol Knight Armstrong, Neil Armstrong’s wife, served as the ship’s sponsor, performing the honor of breaking the traditional bottle of champagne across the ship’s bow.

US Navy Adds New Research Vessel

Carol Armstrong, sponsor for the R/V Neil Armstrong , breaks a bottle across bow during a christening ceremony at Dakota Creek Industries, Inc., shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. Joining Carol on the platform are Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, left, chief of naval research, Dick Nelson, president, Dakota Creek Industries, Inc., and Kali Armstrong, granddaughter of the late astronaut. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Yesterday marked the christening of the U.S. Navy’s new state-of-the-art Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) scientific research vessel R/V Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) at the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Washington. According to the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the newest research vessel will join its six-vessel research fleet next year. Each vesselis assigned to a U.S. oceanographic institution or university, and is operated by a 20-person university crew (up to 24 scientists can be accommodated on Neil Armstrong for research missions lasting up to a month).

AGOR 27 R/V Neil Armstrong Launched

Seattle-based Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering company Guido Perla & Associates, Inc. (GPA) reports that the launching ceremony of the AGOR 27 R/V Neil Armstrong was held at Dakota Creek Industries (DCI) in Anacortes, Wash., on February 22, 2014. Construction of the complex R/V Neil Armstrong and her sister vessel AGOR 28 R/V Sally Ride, also well under way at DCI, have progressed according to plan, meeting original schedule and cost baselines. Throughout the engineering and construction process of both vessels…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2018 - Great Ships of 2018

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