Marine Link
Friday, June 22, 2018

Port Security News

IMO Promotes Single Window for Ports

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

What is a “single window” and why do ports need one? What are the best practices when it comes to electronic business and port logistics? How is  International Maritime Organization (IMO) supporting developing countries to get ready for the Facilitation Convention amendments which make electronic data exchange mandatory from 2019? These and other questions about the role of ports in ensuring the smooth flow of trade by ship will be on the table for discussion at a special event on ports at IMO Headquarters on Monday 11 June.

Port Security Advisory – Nations with Inadequate Port Security Measures

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Port Security Advisory listing nations it has determined to have inadequate port security measures. Ships that have called in any of those nations within the five previous port calls may be subject to increased port state control examination upon arrival in a U.S. port. The enhanced examination may be lessen if the ship establishes a higher security level during the port call, executes a Declaration of Security, logs all security actions in the ship’s log, and reports the actions taken to the USCG Captain of the Port (COTP) prior to arrival in the U.S. port. The nations found to have inadequate port security measures are: Albania…

IMO Brings Port Issues to the Fore

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Global trade by sea is dependent on the interconnection between ships, ports and people - and everyone needs to be involved, from port operators, to regulators, to maritime security experts and innovators in technology. The theme of mutual cooperation and collaboration was highlighted throughout a special event on ports, held at  International Maritime Organization (IMO) Headquarters (11 June). The Special Port Event was supported by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, in collaboration with the International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH).

Metal Shark is Competing - and Winning - Here and Oversees

(Photo: Metal Shark)

U.S. shipbuilder Metal Shark powers into the second half of 2018 with a healthy backlog, multiple recent deliveries into foreign markets, and a portfolio of patrol craft that has attracted multiple clients – here and abroad.At a time when more than a few workboat builders are feeling the pain of lingering offshore malaise and an oversupplied inland market that no longer needs large quantities of barges, Louisiana-based Metal Shark has found its groove in a suddenly active and highly competitive niche market.

Port Security: More Port Security Grant Money Necessary

In early 2002, and again in 2003, the federal government offered rounds of Port Security Grants. They were ostensibly Transportation Security Administration monies administered and meted out jointly by the US Coast Guard and the Maritime Administration (MARAD). There was $93 million in 2002 and about $104 million in 2003. The 2003 grant process is just now being concluded. The most recent opportunity to submit an application to obtain grant monies (out of the funds allocated for this round) closed on February 27, 2003. The distribution of these funds is expected in May, 2003. While the 2003 grants have not yet been distributed, various port authorities around the country have been the dominant users of the previous grants…

Port Security and Facilitation Training in Djibouti

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO) has conducted a national port security and facilitation workshop at the Djibouti Regional Training Centre (DRTC). The workshop (7-8 March) was highlighting IMO's maritime security and facilitation requirements and showcases the range of IMO and other training courses, guidance and tools available, including new port-focused training packages developed in line with the World Maritime Day theme, "Connecting ships, ports and people". The…

65th Anniversary: A U.S. Coast Guard Mission Since 1917

The horrific attacks on 9-11, and the subsequent increase in maritime security required to protect against asymmetric maritime attacks, has dramatically changed the U. S. Coast Guard. They have changed the service's emphasis on port security as well as its ethos in the eyes of the nation it serves. Previously, the Coast Guard received national media attention mostly when it was involved in a dramatic at-sea rescue leaving a public perception of the service as lifesavers. Since 9-11, because of its port security efforts and its overall role in Homeland Security, the Coast Guard has received more national level public, political and media attention than at any other time in its long history and its public image is rapidly shifting from lifesaver to protector. Consider the following examples.

10 Years After 9/11, Security Still a Top Priority of U.S. Ports

AAPA Concerned Federal Budget Cuts May Impact Port Security Progress. Port and industry leaders from throughout the Western Hemisphere will pause on Sunday, Sept. 11, as part of the 100th Annual Convention of the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) in Seattle (Sept. 11-15), to remember those tragically lost in the terrorist attacks on U.S. soil 10 years ago. Among those lost were 84 industry colleagues from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey who perished at the World Trade Center. In the decade since Sept. 11, 2001, America’s seaports and the federal government have joined forces to make major gains in fortifying and hardening port facilities against intruder attack.

VSTEP Introduces NAUTIS Port Security Software

Virtual Training and Simulator developer VSTEP will be demonstrating its new NAUTIS Port Security Awareness simulation software during the Small Vessel Threats Security Conference from 28-29 September in San Francisco. VSTEP is one of the main conference sponsors and will be present at its conference boot to demonstrate its innovative Security Awareness solutions. During the Conference, VSTEP will present its training products directly related to countering the potential threats from small vessels.

Show Me the (Grant) Money

Following the mandates to enhance maritime security throughout the United States, programs were developed to make federal funds available to partially offset the costs being imposed on the private sector. The programs, which started off with great fanfare, are in danger of collapsing due to lack of continued funding by Congress and attempts by the Administration to siphon off monies for other missions. The first monies appropriated by Congress for port security grants were in the Department of Defense and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States Act, 2002 (Pub.L. 107-117, January 10, 2002).

Hollings Secures $29.5 Million for Port

U.S. Sen. Fritz Hollings announced today that he has secured a total of $29.5 million for port security efforts at the Port of Charleston as part of the fiscal year 2004 Omnibus Appropriations bill. The funding is directed to Charleston's Project Seahawk, the nation's first port security command and control center and a project Hollings helped create. The Omnibus spending measure, approved by the Senate Thursday, encompasses the 7 appropriations bills that have yet to be approved individually. The bill will now be sent to the president for his signature. "This Congress and this Administration have failed to provide the funding necessary to secure our ports, and I will not let their lack of foresight threaten security at our Port of Charleston," said Sen.

USCG Issues Port Security Guidelines

The U.S. Coast Guard issued Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) 9-02 entitled Guidelines for Port Security Committees and Port Security Plans Required for U.S. Ports Building on its Maritime Homeland Security Mission, the Coast Guard Headquarters has advised its field units on how to structure the Port Security Committees and how to develop Port Security Plans. By February 28, 2003, each Captain of the Port (COTP) is to conduct a preliminary port level security assessment in conjunction with the Port Security Committee. The assessment will provide the basis for finalizing the Port Security Plan. Source: HK Law

Mozambique Gets Fresh Training on Port Security

Image:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A five-day workshop on maritime security and The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code concluded today in Maputo, Mozambique (24 -28 July). The course provided port facility security officers with the necessary knowledge to perform their duties in accordance with the requirements of key IMO maritime security measures*. As a results, participants improved their knowledge and skills of those requirements with a view to train others with similar responsibilities.

Port Security Training for Mauritanian Officials

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Officials responsible for port security in Mauritania are undergoing a week-long International Maritime Organization (IMO)  training course in the country’s capital of Nouakchott (7-11 August). The course will equip designated authority officials, port security officials and managers with the skills to carry out effective self-assessments and audits of port facilities, in line with IMO’s International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and guidance on voluntary self-assessment.

Port Security Training in Nigeria

Pic: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A workshop in Lagos, Nigeria has helped train Nigerian officials in the necessary skills and knowledge to plan, conduct and assess security drills and exercises in their port facilities. The event (28 August – 1 September) focused on port security measures of the Organization’s ISPS Code. The participants included designated authority officials, port facilities security officials, ISPS auditors, national regulators and ISPS inspectors. Led by an International Maritime Organization…

EC Sues Spain over Port Security

The European Commission is taking action against Spain before the Court of Justice of the European Union, because 20 Spanish ports have yet to adopt and implement the port security plan. The main objective of European port security policy is to provide protection for ships and port facilities, as part of the maritime link in the transport logistics chain, against the risk of attacks and terrorism. Directive 2005/65/EC on enhancing port security aims to guarantee uniformly high levels of security in all European ports, in particular by implementing a port security plan laying down provisions for ensuring port security. Since June 15, 2007…

AAPA Calls for “Continued Progress” in Port Security

In the nearly five years since 9/11, America’s seaports and the federal government have joined forces to make major gains in fortifying and hardening port facilities against intruder attack. “Public port authorities have made seaport security their top priority since September 11, 2001,” said Kurt Nagle, American Association of Port Authorities’ president and CEO. With the combined efforts of public ports, initiatives of federal agencies within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) such as the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection (CBP), ports are significantly safer now than prior to 9/11, he noted. “Ports are a vital part of our nation’s transportation infrastructure and serve as international borders to nearly all U.S. overseas trade,” said Mr. Nagle.

Port Security: Preventing Stowaways

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Enhanced port security can help the in the facilitation of international maritime traffic and the prevention of stowaways. A national workshop in Freetown, Sierra Leone (6-10 November) is one of a series assisting ports with the highest number of stowaway incidents to address these issues. Meetings with key stakeholders responsible for maritime security and facilitation are being used to gauge knowledge of national legislation, port facility security plans, local organization of maritime security and facilitation, and inter-agency cooperation through security and facilitation committees.

Training for Port Security Staff in Guinea

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Port security officials in Guinea have undergone training on complying with International Maritime Organization (IMO)’s maritime security measures. They are being trained in how to perform their duties in line with SOLAS Chapter XI-2, the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and related guidance. The event in Conakry, Guinea (20-24 November) is being organised in conjunction with Guinea’s Maritime Authority and the Ministry of Transport. The training involves Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) and representatives of the Designated Authority (DA).

Port Security Training Drills in Argentina

Photo: Naval Prefecture Argentina

The Naval Prefecture Argentina, following the guidelines of the Ministry of National Security, held this morning the annual exercise PEMADOCK (Plan Major Emergency Area Port Dock Sud) in order to achieve rapid and effective response to a potential loss of the extent that the activity proposed. The crack of a pipe was simulated following maintenance work on the spring, aggravating the box by an explosion, followed by fire and hydrocarbon spill. The scenario led to the launch of PEMADOCK.

Djibouti Provides ​​Port Security Training

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Ports provide the critical interface between the ship and the shore. For maritime trade to flow effectively, this vital infrastructure needs to be secure – and this involves people at all levels. A national maritime security training workshop in Djibouti (19-23 March) included practical exercises and a site visit to a nearby port facility as well as class-based training in how to implement the relevant provisions of International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s code on International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and related guidance.

Two Newbuilds Delivered to Virgin Islands Port Authority

Photo: Metal Shark

Louisiana-based shipbuilder Metal Shark said it has delivered two custom welded aluminum vessels to the Virgin Islands Port Authority (VIPA).The new vessels, a 45-foot pilot boat and a 32-foot port security vessel, were designed by Metal Shark and built at the company’s Jeanerette, La. production facility. Both vessels were recently delivered to St. Thomas and transferred to VIPA and are now operating from the Edward Wilmoth Blyden IV Marine Facility on the Charlotte Amalie waterfront where they serve the island of St. Thomas and nearby St.

Port Security Workshop in Arabic-Language

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

For the first time, a national workshop on IMO's International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) was delivered in Arabic during a five-day training course held in Doha, Qatar (22-26 April). Designated authority and port facility security officers had the chance to improve their knowledge and understanding through practical exercises as well as class-based training in how to implement the relevant provisions of the ISPS Code, SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and related guidance. The participants will now be equipped with the necessary skills to train others with similar responsibilities.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News