Marine Link
Monday, June 25, 2018

Columbia River News

Five Rescued Near Columbia River Entrance

The crew of the commercial fishing vessel Sea Ballad acted as good Samaritans and rescued five fellow commercial fishermen after the fishing vessel Star King, a 55-foot stern trawler homeported in Astoria, Ore., sank near the entrance to the Columbia River, Jan. 7, 2017. Photo USCG

The Coast Guard and a good Samaritan commercial fishing crew rescued five people from the water after the fishing vessel Star King, a 55-foot stern trawler homeported in Astoria, capsized and sank near the entrance to the Columbia River early Saturday morning. All five fishermen were pulled from the water by the crew of the fishing vessel Sea Ballad and were transferred to the Coast Guard 47-foot Motor Life Boat crew, from Station Cape Disappointment, who transported them to the station in Ilwaco, Wash., where they did not need medical attention.

Dockside Repair of the USCGC Bluebell

Photo: Vanport Marine

Portland, Oregon-based Vanport Marine, Inc. has been awarded the contract to perform the Dockside Repair of the USCGC Bluebell. The scope of the contract includes upgrades to the Allied buoy and cargo crane, deck preservation, repairs to the weather tight doors, renewal of the sewage shore tie valve, and repair of the remote fuel cutoff valve and deck box. The work will be completed at the vessel’s home pier at 676 N. Basin Ave, Portland, OR. The performance period will begin on June 12, 2018 and end July 18, 2018. The cutter Bluebell is an inland buoy tender built by the Birchfield Boiler Co.

Coast Guard Creates Sector Columbia River

The Coast Guard created Sector Columbia River when Sector Portland, Ore. combined with Group/Air Station Astoria, Ore., during a ceremony in Astoria, August 23. The formation of Sector Columbia River is part of an initiative commonly referred to as "sectorization," part of a nationwide effort to consolidate the many responsibilities, missions and jurisdictions within the Coast Guard. The move is also aimed at increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of Coast Guard personnel and assets. "The merger of these two major Coast Guard commands is designed to help improve and streamline our operational command and control organization for our many missions allowing for better service to our customers throughout the entire Columbia River region and along the Oregon coast…

Columbia River Deepening Comments Welcome

The Washington State Department of Ecology has reopened the comment period with regard to the proposal to deepen the navigable channel of the Columbia River. Comments are sought with regard to possible ocean disposal of the dredge spoil. Comments should be submitted by June 9, 2003. (5/20/03). (Source: Haight Gardner Holland & Knight, May 2003)

Vessel Spills 80 Gallons of Oil Into Columbia River

Nord Auckland . Pic by Norden

Columbia's state environmental agency said that roughly 80 gallons of oil was spilled into the Columbia River by a vessel near Kalama. The Nord Auckland, a 618-foot ship flagged in Singapore, reportedly spilled the waste oil during an internal oil transfer on Thursday morning. The ship, owned and operated by Denmark’s Norden, was at anchor when an apparent operator error led to the spill of substances which were intended to be incinerated. The multi-team response was coordinated by the Washington Department of Ecology and the US Coast Guard (USCG).

Oregonian Raises New Questions

An independent review conducted and reported today by the Oregonian concludes that the government’s economic justifications for a controversial proposal to dredge the Columbia River are deeply flawed. The Corps of Engineers wants to spend $196 million to dredge more than 100 miles of the Columbia River. In a three-part series beginning today, the Oregonian will report that deficiencies in the analysis have significantly inflated the benefits to the region and an underestimated the costs to taxpayers. “The Corps of Engineers’ math does not add up,” said David Moryc, Lower Columbia River Coordinator for American Rivers. Since the Corps released their final Environmental Impact Statement in 1999…

President Proposes to Deepen Columbia River Channel

President George W. Bush recently delivered remarks on the Columbia River Channel Deepening Project in Portland, Ore., announcing a $15 million budget amendment for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to begin construction on the project. President George W. Bush said he will propose to add $15 million to the federal budget to fund deepening of the Columbia River navigation channel from the current 40 ft. depth to 43 ft.. This project, if approved, would allow ships to load larger grain cargoes for export. Following are excerpted comments from his speech, given August 13, 2004.

Columbia River Channel Project Gets Greenlight

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that Major General Carl A. Strock, Director of Civil Works, has signed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. Construction of the navigation improvements and associated ecosystem restoration features may now proceed after a cost-sharing agreement is signed. Issuance of the ROD - a written public record under the National Environmental Policy Act explaining why the agency has decided upon a particular course of action - clears the way for the Corps' Portland District to begin work improving the federal navigation channel that stretches 103 miles between the Pacific Ocean and Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash.

Corps Gives Final Approval to Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers today announced that Major General Carl A. Strock, Director of Civil Works, has signed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. Construction of the navigation improvements and associated ecosystem restoration features may now proceed after a cost-sharing agreement is signed. Issuance of the ROD -- a written public record under the National Environmental Policy Act explaining why the agency has decided upon a particular course of action - clears the way for the Corps' Portland District to begin work improving the federal navigation channel that stretches 103 miles between the Pacific Ocean and Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash.

Columbia River Mystery Spill Settled

The Washington State Department of Ecology issued a News Release stating that the Evergreen Marine Corporation has agreed to pay more than $130,900 to settle a penalty and other assessments related to a March 2001 oil spill into the Columbia River. Approximately 500 gallons of oily waste was found in the river in the vicinity of Kalama and was attributed to the M/V Ever Group. Source: HK Law

Vessel grounds, Refloats on Columbia River

The Coast Guard responded to a vessel grounded at the mouth of the Columbia River earlier this week. The motor vessel Apollon was grounded at the mouth of the Columbia River. The vessel was refloated, no pollution, damage to the vessel or injuries to the 21-member crew are reported. Coast Guard Group/Air Station Astoria, OR. Marine Safety Office Portland and Station Cape Disappointment responded to the grounding of the motor vessel Apollon, a 623-ft wheat carrier. The vessel was aground in the vicinity of the Clatsop Spit, Oregon between buoys 12 and 14. The Peruvian-flagged vessel, which was bound for the Philippines, refloated itself and proceeded out to sea on its own power.

Tanker Runs Aground near Skamokawa, Wash.

U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy Sector Columbia River.

A 557-foot tanker Argent Cosmos lost use of a fuel pump and ran aground near Skamokawa, Wash. at 6:28 a.m. Thursday while heading outbound on the Columbia River following a port call in Longview, Wash. The Panamanian-flagged tanker is loaded with 1.63 million gallons of ethanol and 6.65 million gallons of monoethylene glycol. It also has 458,074 gallons of high-sulfur oil and 99,064 gallons of low-sulfur oil aboard. There have been no reports of pollution in the river, flooding aboard the vessel or injuries to crewmembers, according to the U.S.

Shaver Transportation Selects Rapp Marine Winch Package

Photo: Rapp Marine

Shaver Transportation of Portland, OR, operating vessels within the Columbia River region of the Pacific Northwest for over a hundred years, has selected Rapp Marine as the supplier of the two heavy-duty load handling winches on their latest tugboat. Rapp Marine has almost two decades of experience of designing and delivering rugged winches for workboat market, and has been around as a company for over a hundred years as well. The latest tugboat to the Shaver Transportation fleet is designed by Jensen Maritime of Seattle, WA and is under construction at Diversified Marine of Portland, OR.

Car Carrier M/V Morning Spruce Adrift off Columbia River Entrance

M/V Morning Spruce: Credit USCG

ASTORIA, Ore. — The Coast Guard is coordinating actions to protect the Oregon Coast from any threat posed by the 648-foot, Singapore-flagged car-carrier Morning Spruce that lost all power and was adrift in 12-foot seas, for approximately 4 ½ hours, southwest of the Columbia River entrance Sunday. At approximately 3:30 p.m., Sunday, the Morning Spruce’s engineer was able to restore the ship’s power. The Coast Guard has directed the Morning Spruce to remain offshore until repairs to the ship have been verified.

Operation Make Way Conducted on Columbia River

The US Coast Guard stated that federal, state, and local officials conducted Operation Make Way along the lower portion of the Columbia River. The education and enforcement operation was designed to help boaters understand the need to give way and stay clear of commercial deep draft vessels restricted in their ability to maneuver. Twenty-eight violations were issued to recreational boaters during this operation. Source: HK Law

Grounded Bulk Carrier Refloated in Washington

Coast Guard monitors aground motor vessel in Columbia River  (Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Levi Read)

The U.S. Coast Guard is responding to an incident involving a motor vessel that grounded in the Columbia River near Skamokawa, Washington, Friday night. The motor vessel Rosco Palm, a 751-foot Hong Kong-flagged cargo ship reportedly ran aground at 7:49 p.m. on Friday night, refloated, moved to a few miles upstream to mitigate collision risk and then grounded while at anchor on sand bottom while waiting for first light assessment. The vessel has refloated with the tide at 7:40 am and there is no indication of pollution being discharged.

Coast Guard Helo Crew Hoists Men Stranded in Oregon

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ali Flockerzi

A U.S. Coast Guard aircrew rescued three men after they became stranded by the rising tide at Indian Beach, Wednesday.   The helicopter crew from Sector Columbia River safely hoisted the men and transported them to Canon Beach Fire Department personnel waiting on shore. Sector watchstanders received a report from Seaside 911 dispatchers with a request for assistance at 12:20 p.m. after the three men, who were fishing in tide pools, became stranded due to high tide. There were no reported injuries at the time of the rescue.

NTSB Issues Report on 2016 Columbia River Bulker Grounding

Nenita, a 378-foot Marshall Islands-flagged bulk carrier laden with grain, ran aground in the Columbia River near Skamokawa, Wash., November 19, 2016. (U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Sector Columbia River)

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued a report on its investigation into the November 2016 grounding of the bulk carrier Nenita in the Columbia River. The Marshall Islands-flagged vessel was fully laden when it suffered an engine failure that impacted its ability to maneuver and subsequently ran aground at Three Tree Point on the Washington State side of the river. The ship’s bulbous bow and hull were damaged, but no injuries or pollution were reported. The vessel was towed to Longview, Wash.

Barge Company Fined for Fertilizer Spill into Columbia, Snake Rivers

Source: CSR Lock System

A local barge company has been fined $18,000 for spilling 40,000 gallons of liquid urea ammonium nitrate into the Snake and Columbia rivers. Urea ammonium nitrate is a common fertilizer that is corrosive to steel. An investigation by the Washington Department of Ecology found that two steel tank barges owned and operated by Tidewater Barge Lines, Inc. were not properly maintained, causing the liquid fertilizer to spill into the rivers during three separate incidents in April 2017.

Nenita Ran Aground in Columbia River

 U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Sector Columbia River.

The bulk carrier Nenita ran aground in lower Columbia river near Skamokawa in Washington, USA. Watch standers with Sector Columbia River in Warrenton were notified at 3:21 a.m. that the 738-foot Nenita, a Marshall Islands-flagged bulk carrier loaded with grain and less than 300,000 gallons of fuel, was headed outbound on the Columbia when it lost propulsion and ran hard aground. The vessel started taking on water, but the crew found the break in the forward peak of the vessel and stopped the flooding. The vessel was refloated, inspected and ordered by the Coast Guard to Kalama, Washington.

Vessel Runs Aground in Columbia River near Skamokawa

The motor vessel Nenita, a 378-foot Marshall Islands-flagged bulk carrier laden with grain sits aground in the Columbia River near Skamokawa, Wash., Photo USCG

The Coast Guard is monitoring the transit of a motor vessel that ran aground in the Columbia River near Skamokawa, Washington, but was refloated, inspected and given a captain of the port order to transit to Kalama, Saturday morning. There was no report of pollution or injuries stemming from the grounding of the Nenita, a 738-foot Marshall Islands-flagged bulk carrier fully laden with grain. Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Columbia River were notified of the incident at 3:21 a.m.

Injured Crewman Hoisted over 170 mi off Columbia River

MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew, from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River in Warrenton, Ore., hoists an injured crew member from the 618-foot cargo vessel Global Saikai over 170 miles from the Columbia River Photo USCG

A Coast Guard aircrew performed a medical evacuation of an injured crew member from a 618-foot cargo vessel over 170 miles offshore from the Columbia River, Saturday. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River in Warrenton safely transported the 23-year-old man to the air station where he was transferred over to emergency medical personnel, who took him to Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria. Watchstanders at Sector Columbia River received the assistance…

Freighter Briefly Grounds in Columbia River

A 528-foot foreign freighter grounded in the Columbia River near Skamokawa, Wash. The Coast Guard and other response personnel were responding to the incident. The Motor Vessel Global Challenger grounded in the vicinity of Pillar Point Range at river mile 30 while transiting upriver on the Columbia River. There are 258,836 gallons of heavy oil and 56,339 gallons of diesel onboard. Vessel personnel are currently taking soundings of all fuel tanks. At this time, there is no pollution in the water. Personnel from Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Portland are en route to the scene to investigate the incident. Four commericial tug boats are also en route to attempt to re float the freighter at high tide on Friday morning.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

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