Gasfired Plants News

15 Apr 2019

Rotterdam Port Produce Less Emissions

Photo: Kees Torn, Port of Rotterdam

The industry in the port of Rotterdam has released less CO2 into the atmosphere for the second year in a row.According to new figures published by the Dutch Emissions Authority (NEA), the sector has cut its emissions by 13.6% (4.2 million tonnes) over the past two years.For the second year in a row, industry in the port of Rotterdam has released less CO2 into the atmosphere. This becomes clear from new figures published by the Dutch Emissions Authority (NEA). The sector has cut…

29 Oct 2016

India in Global Hunt for LNG

Photo: Piyush Goyal, Official FB Page

India is scouting for new liquefied natural gas (LNG) contracts globally as part of a push to secure cheap supplies for its under-utilized gas-fired power plants, reports Bloomberg. Australia, Qatar and Iran could all act as potential suppliers of long-term LNG contracts, power minister Piyush Goyal said in Sydney. The global search for LNG comes as India’s gas-fired plants, which can generate nearly 25 gigawatts of power, run at less than a quarter of their capacity because of a shortage of the fuel at affordable prices. “I think gas needs to be between $5 and $5.50 landed at my power plant.

11 Apr 2012

Wind Power Seen Surging as Custom Barges Cut Cost

Offshore wind-power producers from Dong Energy A/S to RWE AG are building custom ships at record rates to reduce the cost of the technology which is  three times as pricey as electricity from coal plants. As many as 20 vessels, some with movable legs which reach the seafloor, will come onto the market in the next few years, reducing chartering costs of as much as 200,000 euros ($261,000) a day, said Marc Seidel, an offshore engineer at Suzlon Energy Ltd., which supplies turbines to Germany’s RWE. A lack of specialized installation ships has forced companies to hire barges designed for oil exploration, holding up work at projects such as EON AG’s Robin Rigg wind farm off Scotland’s western coast.

06 Jun 2011

IEA Report: Natural Gas’ Potential “Golden Age”

As supply and demand factors increasingly point to a future in which natural gas plays a greater role in the global energy mix, the International Energy Agency (IEA) released a special report exploring the potential for a “golden age” of gas. The new report, part of the World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2011 series, examines the key factors that could result in a more prominent role for natural gas in the global energy mix, and the implications for other fuels, energy security and climate change. The report, titled, “Are We Entering a Golden Age of Gas?” presents a scenario in which global use of gas rises by more than 50% from 2010 levels and accounts for more than a quarter of global energy demand by 2035.

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