Marine Link
Thursday, October 18, 2018

Maritime Safety Committee News

ICS Encouraged by 2020 Global Sulphur Cap Progress

Image: International Chamber of Shipping

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) says it is encouraged by efforts made by IMO Member States to resolve some pressing practical challenges ahead of the global implementation of the 0.5 percent sulphur in fuel cap on January 1, 2020.Speaking after an IMO working group meeting last week, to which the industry submitted a number of constructive proposals to help ensure smooth and consistent implementation, ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe, remarked, “Although there is still much work to be done, last week’s IMO discussions were positive.

Maritime Cook Islands Highlights “Positive Progress” to Tokyo MOU White List

Image: Maritime Cook Islands Limited

The Cook Islands flag, operated by ship registry Maritime Cook Islands (MCI), has shown positive flag state performance, as reported in the latest report on Port State Control in the Asia Pacific Region by Tokyo MOU. The data and figures were published in the new report on Port State Control in the Asia Pacific by Tokyo MOU. The Tokyo MOU is “one of the most active regional port State control (PSC) organisations in the world” and consists of 20 member authorities in the Asia-Pacific region.

Interview: Kitack Lim, Secretary-General, IMO

Kitack Lim, Secretary-General, IMO. Photo: IMO

As the International Maritime Organization (IMO) celebrates its 70th anniversary, Kitack Lim, Secretary-General, sits in his London office with a sense of satisfaction that in his two plus years at the helm of IMO tremendous strides have been made toward significant greenhouse gas emission reductions, punctuated by the recent MEPC meeting where the target was set for a 50% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050. But the Secretary- General’s sense of satisfaction is tempered with the fact that his job has just begun and his plate is full.

Gulf of Guinea Plans to Enhance Maritime Security

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO) is supporting countries from the Gulf of Guinea region in their plans to enhance maritime security.Participants from 10 countries - Benin, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Senegal and Togo, as well as international partners such as INTERPOL and the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office - are taking part in a workshop in Monterey, USA (6-10 August) on developing and refining their work plans. This includes…

IMO on Maritime Security in 21st Century

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO) Secretary-General Kitack Lim has highlighted the Organization’s work and response to a changing maritime security landscape.Speaking at the ‘Maritime security in the 21st century’ symposium at the Brazilian Naval War College, Rio de Janeiro (20 July), he said that “threats to the port and shipping sectors are constantly evolving and so is IMO’s response” and emphasized that “IMO is addressing the digital revolution in all aspects of its work”.Autonomous vessels…

ICS Guidance on Preparing for 2020 Sulphur Cap

Image: International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)

To assist shipping companies prepare for implementation of the UN IMO global sulphur cap for ships’ fuel oil, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has produced – free of charge – some comprehensive guidance on implementation planning, to help ensure compliance across the shipping industry with this regulatory game changer. The free ICS guidance has been prepared for the vast majority of ships that will comply after 1 January 2020 using fuel oils with a sulphur content of 0.50% m/m or less.ICS Secretary General…

IMO Okays U.S.-Russian Bering Strait Routing Plan

Image: PACIFIC ENVIRONMENT

The International Maritime Organization approved the Bering Strait and Bering Sea ship routing measures proposed by the United States and Russian Federation. Taking effect Dec. 1, 2018, the six two-way routes and six precautionary areas are the first internationally recognized ship routing measures the IMO has approved for polar waters. In November 2017, the U.S. and Russia proposed a system of two-way routes for vessels to follow in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea in response to increased shipping traffic there.

Cyber Vigilance at Sea: The New Norm

© Sergei Simonov / Adobe Stock

The risk of cyber attacks on vessels at sea continues to be significant, and it’s not going away any time soon. Each year, it seems, there are more and more reports of hacks that have resulted in loss of critical data, financial loss or problems with IT systems or shipborne systems functionality. Shipowners have been reluctant to share information on actual or attempted breaches for fear of being identified. However, there’s no shortage of examples of cyber attacks on vessels.

IMO Set to Adopt Passenger Ship Safety Amendments

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Revised safety requirements to ensure new-build passenger ships remain afloat after a major incident are among a set of amendments set for adoption by International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), which meets from 7-16 June. The revisions to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) chapter II-1, relating to subdivision and damage stability, follow a substantive review of SOLAS chapter II-1, focusing in particular on passenger ships.

GBS Verification Process Completed

Direct strength assessment software: Comprehensive analyses with whole ship FE models (Photo: ClassNK)

IMO Maritime Safety Committee has confirmed completion of the corrective actions requested by IMO to the International Association of Classification Societies’ (IACS) Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers (CSR BC&OT) under the agenda item 6, Goal-Based New Ship Construction Standards (GBS) at its 98th session held on June 7, 2017. Previously, MSC96 confirmed CSR BC&OT complied with GBS in 2016, and the ships constructed in compliance with the rules at that time should be deemed as compliant with GBS.

Autonomous Ships on IMO Agenda

Image: Danish Maritime Authority

Now, the International Maritime Organization (IMO)  Maritime Safety Committee will start to establish a new international legal framework for the safe operation of autonomous ships, says a statement from Danish Maritime Authority. Together with a number of countries, Denmark, has taken the initiative to include autonomous shipping on the IMO agenda. United Nations' IMO is in line with the proposal and will now start mapping how existing international regulation can be applied to autonomous ships and maritime technologies; technologies that are developing rapidly these years.

Digitisation is Priority for FEPORT

Photo: FEPORT

FEPORT supports the approach of the Estonian presidency and believes that four priorities constitute a consistent strategy for Europe. The four priorities are:  An open and innovative European Economy, A safe and secure Europe,  A digital Europe and the free flow of data and  An inclusive and sustainable Europe. Besides endorsing the content of the paper that has been co-signed by 22 organizations representing different industries of the logistics chain, FEPORT would like to underline in this paper a number of key items for private terminal operators.

Iridium Plans to Start GMDSS Service in 2020

Iridium Communications Inc. announced that two key milestones along the path to becoming the second recognized provider of Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS) services have been reached. During its 98th session this past June, the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) adopted new performance standards for GMDSS equipment and approved amendments to the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Treaty, which pave the way for Iridium to become a recognized GMDSS service provider. Now, the key remaining step in the approval process is an IMO resolution recognizing Iridium as a certified GMDSS mobile satellite service provider. Iridium expects this will be completed during calendar year 2018, with Iridium GMDSS service to begin in 2020.

USCG Releases Draft Cyber Guide for Maritime Facilities

James Espino (Photo: Gnostech)

Cyber risk has hit a critical peak within the maritime industry, and the significant impact of the Petya ransomware attack on scores of maritime entities only amplifies it. The attack effectively shut down major ocean carriers, including shipping conglomerate Maersk, and impacted marine terminal operations across the globe. Every maritime company, no matter the size or business function, is a potential target. The industry has seen a recent wave of guidelines and resolutions from maritime regulatory bodies related to maritime security and cyber risk mitigation.

Transas Survival Craft Simulator Eliminates Drill Risks

Photo: Transas

Transas has introduced a new Survival Craft Simulator (SCS) to prepare crew for the multitude of possible scenarios that can occur during lifeboat drills, aiming to address one of the most notorious sources of accidents in shipping without exposing personnel to physical danger. Effective survival craft training is essential to prepare crew for a disaster at sea but practical lifeboat drills have a troubling track record for causing fatalities. By shifting some elements of training to a simulated environment…

IMO for Spreading Cyber Security

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Cyber security awareness on board ships plays an important role in ensuring the safety and security of shipping around the globe. International Maritime Organization (IMO) has issued Guidelines on maritime cyber risk management, in addition to a resolution on Maritime Cyber Risk Management in Safety Management Systems – adopted by the Organization's Maritime Safety Committee in June this year. To help spread knowledge and use of these high-level recommendations – IMO has taken…

SAR is Global Responsibility: IMO

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

​Search and rescue (SAR) is a humanitarian process, aimed at assisting persons in distress, without regard to the nationality or circumstances of the persons in distress. International Maritime Organization (IMO) 's Chris Trelawny highlighted this global responsibility, during the first Coast Guard Global Summit, jointly hosted by the Japan Coast Guard and Tokyo-based Nippon Foundation, in Tokyo (14 September). He also outlined the international legal framework for SAR; the implementation of effective SAR systems…

Training for Port Security Staff in Guinea

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Port security officials in Guinea have undergone training on complying with International Maritime Organization (IMO)’s maritime security measures. They are being trained in how to perform their duties in line with SOLAS Chapter XI-2, the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and related guidance. The event in Conakry, Guinea (20-24 November) is being organised in conjunction with Guinea’s Maritime Authority and the Ministry of Transport. The training involves Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs) and representatives of the Designated Authority (DA).

Driver-less Ships: Autonomy in the Maritime Sector

 “Phase 1” to “2”: Rolls-Royce’s remote monitoring facility at Longva, near Aalesund. Photo: William Stoichevski

In a show of prototypes, a pod of unmanned sailboats from around the world competes to cross “The Atlantic” test tank in Horten, Norway. Cross the real ocean, and the Sail Bots race similarly challenges scholarly robotic-vessel designers to North America for a bit of station-keeping, collision-avoidance and “cargo moves”. For all, the future seems bright — the first commercial runs of unmanned vessels are underway or scheduled worldwide. These earliest movers have the support of governments, Google and grateful clients.

Navigating the New Norm

Christopher J. Wiernicki (Photo: ABS)

It is not business as usual in the world where we do business. Things are changing. Even regulations themselves are changing from less prescriptive in nature to more performance-based. As Chairman, President and CEO of a global classification and technology-centric company that operates in 70 countries with 5,000 employees, I am continually assessing the impact of these changes on the capabilities ABS needs to fulfill its mission and maintain its leadership position in the maritime, offshore and government industries it serves. To know where we are heading, we have to know where we began.

New Ships’ Routing Systems in Kattegat

Ruter Kattegat Skagerrak Photo courtesy Danish Maritime Authority

The IMO NCSR Sub-Committee has approved the Danish Maritime Authority’s proposal for new ships’ routeing measures, thereby bringing new routes in the Skagerrak and the Kattegat one step closer and enhancing safety of navigation. Because of developments in shipping, the ships transiting these waters today are larger than those for which the routes were originally designed. Approx. 7,000 ships transit the Kattegat each year, the majority of which are deep-draught ships heading for or coming from the Baltic Sea.

Role-Playing to Design Security Drills

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A four-day workshop on how to best design and conduct drills and maritime security exercises, has been held in Kingston, Jamaica (13-16 March), said a press release from International Maritime Organization (IMO). The aim of the event was to equip participants with the necessary skills and knowledge to plan, conduct and assess security drills and exercises in their port facilities. The workshop also included live role-playing sessions with various communication equipment. This helps port facility security officers…

KR Releases KR-CON V16

Classification society Korean Register (KR) announced that it has released the 16th version of its KR-CON software. First launched in 1997, the software program set out to help surveyors, shipbuilders and PSC officers to search for IMO instruments more accurately, quickly and conveniently. The original database program provided all IMO conventions, codes, resolutions and circulars in a CD-ROM format. Since then, KR-CON has been revised and updated 15 times and is now available in English, Korean and Chinese and is accessed on USB, via the web and a mobile application. For the 16th KR-CON, KR said it has put considerable effort into the creation of more user-friendly interface.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2018 - Marine Design Annual

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