Marine Link
Sunday, April 22, 2018

Wales News

Harris Pye IMarEST Wales Branch Award

The importance of encouraging young marine engineers in their career development is fully recognised by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) and the Harris Pye Group. That is why the annual Harris Pye Sponsorship Award will be run in association with the Wales Branch of the IMarEST. "The Wales Branch of IMarEST has traditionally presented awards to recognise excellence in achievement in branches of marine engineering, marine science subjects and in marine technology," explained Paul F. Hancock, Chairman of the Awards Sub Committee of the Wales Branch IMarEST. The winning candidate will be a marine engineering student…

Welsh Secretary Says Ports are Vital for Economy

David Jones MP, Secretary of State for Wales (Photo: davidjones-mp.com)

The Welsh Secretary of State David Jones has announced his intention to host a reception during September’s London International Shipping Week to highlight the importance of the Welsh maritime sector. And he has highlighted the economic importance of Welsh ports, stating, “Welsh ports, their industry and the passengers and freight passing through them, form a vital part of the economic infrastructure of Wales. They also make a wider contribution to the U.K. In an article written for the U.K. Chamber of Shipping’s website, David Jones MP, Secretary of State for Wales said, “I believe the U.K.

WESMAR Thrusters Important Equipment For Alaska Ferry

For years the citizens of Prince of Wales Island in southeast Alaska were only able to commute to the Island of Ketchikan on a weekly basis, leaving them frustrated and isolated. In January of 2002 the 150 passenger car/ferry Prince of Wales entered service providing a much awaited daily transportation link between the two islands, and providing the 5,000 residents of the remote southeast Alaska region with a critical link and regular, reliable service—something they had long been without. It took long years of hard work to accomplish this contact with the outside. The community, unhappy with the level of service provided to them by the Alaska Marine Highway system…

HMS Prince of Wales’ Final Carrier Block Delivered

CB04 will be lifted onto HMS Prince of Wales in four sections. (Photo: Aircraft Carrier Alliance)

The final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier produced by Cammell Laird arrived at Babcock Rosyth Facilities in Fife on Thursday, September 3, following their voyage from Birkenhead. Center Block 4 is the longest of the upper sections of hull of HMS Prince of Wales, the second of two new aircraft carriers being constructed by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance. Comprised in two parts (rings C and D), it contains a mixture of aviation workshops, mission system compartments and training rooms.

Austal Wins Six Boat Contract

Austal won a contract for the design, construction and supply of six 16-m aluminium monohull boats for the Water Police in the Australian state of New South Wales. This order will add to the previous Austal delivery of two 22 m and seven 16 m patrol boats delivered in 2000. As with the previous vessels this order will be built over a period of approximately 10 months. The boats have been ordered as part of a four-year upgrade of the Water Police fleet. New South Wales Minister for Police, Carl Scully, said that once the upgrade was complete the Water Police would have a virtually new fleet, with the latest technology and an expanded counter-terrorist capability.

Huge Hull for HMS Prince of Wales Ready for Delivery

Photo courtesy of BAE Systems

BAE Systems informed that a huge section of the U.K. Royal Navy’s second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier, HMS Prince of Wales, was loaded onto a barge in Glasgow over the weekend ahead of its departure to Rosyth later this month. The 8,000-metric-ton mid hull section called Lower Block 03 (LB03) is larger than an entire Type 45 destroyer and contains 160 cabins, machinery space, a portion of the aircraft hangar and even a bakery. Over the weekend it was maneuvered out of the BAE Systems ship build hall where it was constructed and onto a barge alongside on the River Clyde.

Ship Aground Off Coast of Wales

A cargo ship, 82 m in length, registered in Antigua, is pinned against the sea defence wall at Llanddulas, North Wales The ship, carrying a cargo of bulk limestone, with a crew of seven Polish seamen on board was thought to have struck a rock near Raynes Jetty at Llanddulas, near Colwyn Bay during a Force 9 storm, according to the Mail news report. Two lifeboats have been launched and shore-based rescuers attemp to rescue the crew as heavy waves break over the stranded vessel. It was not clear what the reason for the accident was.  

Low Sulphur Fuel Regulation for Cruise Ships at NSW Ports

  The Port Authority of New South Wales (NSW) has issued advice about the Consultation Draft of a new regulation requiring cruise ships to use low sulphur diesel fuel (sulphur content of 0.1% or less) from 1 October. If the regulation is passed, this would be applicable for all cruise ships visiting Sydney Harbour, and then to include all New South Wales ports from 1 July 2016. For information about operations in Australia contact GAC Australia at shipping.australia@gac.com

Dee Estuary Dredging Alternatives Considered

Environment Agency Wales and the other regulators, the Welsh Assembly Government and the Department of Transport, are in the process of considering alternative solutions with respect to the current applications from the Port of Mostyn, for dredging and disposal of material in the Dee Estuary in North East Wales. All three regulators made an initial decision, independently of each other, that they were not able to grant the applications as the proposed dredge, in combination with the disposal, may cause loss of sand with eventual reduction in area of sand banks by up to 50 hectares per annum. This could threaten the ecological integrity of the site, including its importance as an international site for migratory birds.

Prince of Wales' Final Section Sails for Rosyth

Photo: BAE Systems

The final section of aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales began its delivery voyage from Glasgow to Rosyth today, 10 weeks ahead of schedule. As part of the the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier program, newbuilds HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales will be the Royal Navy’s largest and most advanced ever warships and were constructed in blocks in different shipyards throughout the U.K. The final section being delivered, known as the Aft Island, weighs 750 metric tons and will control aircraft operations aboard the second aircraft carrier, HMS Prince of Wales.

Wales Reflects on Sea Empress Oil Spill

On the night of Thursday, February 15, 1996, shortly after 8pm the 147,000-ton supertanker Sea Empress had begun the final stages of its three-day voyage from Grangemouth, at the mouth of the River Forth, to Milford Haven docks and the Texaco refinery. As it was being piloted into port, the tanker, carrying a full cargo of North Sea light crude, ran aground on rocks in Mill Bay, just off St Ann’s Head, rupturing its oil tanks. What followed amounted to the UK’s third largest oil spill and, according to ic Wales, Wales’ worst environmental disaster. Over the course of the following week a total of 72,000 tons of oil leaked into the sea…

HMS Prince of Wales’ Aft Island Lifted into Place

Photo: Aircraft Carrier Alliance

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance successfully lifted one of the final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier in Rosyth on Friday, January 8 following its arrival from Glasgow. The 750-metric-ton block was raised 25 meters in the air using the Goliath crane and placed on the deck of HMS Prince of Wales, bringing assembly work on the ship significantly closer to completion. This section to be assembled is known as the Aft Island and will control aircraft operations aboard HMS Prince of Wales.

Wesmar Thrusters Propel Alaska Ferry to Success

For years the citizens of Prince of Wales Island in southeast Alaska were only able to commute to the Island of Ketchikan on a weekly basis, leaving them frustrated and isolated. In January of 2002 the 150 passenger car/ferry Prince of Wales entered service providing a much awaited daily transportation link between the two islands, and providing the 5,000 residents of the remote southeast Alaska region with a critical link and regular, reliable service-something they had long been without. It took long years of hard work to accomplish this contact with the outside. The community, unhappy with the level of service provided to them by the Alaska Marine Highway system…

Prince Charles Places Final Section of UK Aircraft Carrier

Photo: BAE Systems

The second of the largest warships ever built for the U.K. Royal Navy, the Queen Elizabeth Class carrier HMS Prince of Wales, was given the royal seal of approval when HRH The Prince of Wales, (or Duke of Rothesay, as he is referred to in Scotland), visited Babcock’s Rosyth Facilities and signaled for the final section to be lowered into place, shipbuilder BAE Systems announced. The 570-metric-ton block – known as Sponson 11 – was the final section of the 280-meter-long warship to be manufactured.

HMS Prince of Wales Assembly Begins

Photo courtesy of BAE Systems

Construction of HMS Prince of Wales, the second of two new aircraft carriers for the U.K. Royal Navy, has moved forward with the docking of two of the ship’s largest hull sections – Lower Block 02 and Lower Block 03. The movement of the blocks into the dock at Rosyth marks the beginning of the ship’s assembly phase and comes only days after Prime Minister David Cameron announced that HMS Prince of Wales will enter into service, ensuring that the U.K. will always have one aircraft carrier available.

HMS Prince of Wales Delivery Begins

A huge section of hull for HMS Prince of Wales, the second aircraft carrier being delivered to the Royal Navy, has today departed BAE Systems in Glasgow on a 600-mile journey to Rosyth where final assembly of the ship will take place. The 8,000-metric-ton section, known as Lower Block 03, weighs more than an entire Type 45 destroyer and forms the mid-section of the aircraft carrier’s hull from the keel to the hangar deck. The block, transported by seagoing barge, is scheduled to arrive in Rosyth on Saturday, August 2 where work is currently underway to prepare the dock for the final assembly of HMS Prince of Wales which will begin in September.

Australian Navy Assists in Search for Lost Cruise Passengers

HMAS Choules (Photo: Royal Australian Navy)

The Australian Navy ship HMAS Choules and her MRH 90 helicopter have been involved in the air and sea search for two people believed lost from the Carnival Line cruise ship Carnival Spirit off the New South Wales mid-north coast. HMAS Choules joined the search on Thursday afternoon as she was returning from North Queensland where she was conducting amphibious training exercises. The ship and her helicopter have now been released from the search which was co-ordinated by the New South Wales Water Police. Choules is now on her way to her home port in Sydney.

Ship Grounded on Welsh Coast – Removal Decided

The operation to remove the remaining 24,000 litres of fuel oil, along with oily water and other hazardous materials from the grounded vessel ‘Carrier’ has been completed. The vessel, which ran aground on 4 April near Llanddulas in North Wales, remains aground and is resting against concrete dolosse blocks on the beach close to the North Wales Expressway (A55). The owners of the vessel have declared it a Constructive Total Loss. PGC Demolition, the same company who were awarded the contract to remove the fuel oil from the vessel, were also awarded the contract to remove the wreck of the vessel. Their proposals to cut the vessel up on site and remove it for recycling have been approved by the Deputy to the Secretary of State’s Representative for Maritime Salvage and Intervention…

VIDEO: HMS Queen Elizabeth Floats Out

HMS Queen Elizabeth floating out of her dock for the first time (Photo: QEClassCarriers)

A timelapse video of HMS Queen Elizabeth floating out of her dock for the first time is now available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0ZjQz9vEKw. The float out of the 65,000-metric-ton aircraft carrier took place last Thursday, July 17, at the drydock in Rosyth near Edinburgh. Teams will now continue to outfit the ship and steadily bring her systems to life in preparation for sea trials in 2016. The dock she vacates will be used for final assembly of her sister ship, HMS PPrince of Wales, which will begin in September.

Prince of Wales Visits Seagen at Strangford Lough

Seeing SeaGen close up - HRH Prince Charles with Mrs Arlene Foster, Northern Ireland’s Minister of Enterprise, Trade & Investment. (Photo courtesy Marine Current Turbines)

His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales has visited Marine Current Turbines’ SeaGen, a marine current and tidal stream technology that is deployed in Northern Ireland’s Strangford Lough and generating power into the local grid on a daily basis. On May 13, HRH was greeted by Mr David Lindsay the Lord-Lieutenant for County Down and went on to meet Mrs Arlene Foster MLA Minister of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Martin Wright Managing Director of Marine Current Turbines (MCT), and Professor Peter Gregson DL President and Vice-Chancellor Queen’s University Belfast.

Adsteam To Appeal Ruling Regarding Crewing

Towage group Adsteam Group Ltd. will appeal a New South Wales ports authority ruling that prevented it from applying planned reductions in tugboat crews in the state. "The waterways group considered the matter yesterday, heard submissions from both sides, and concluded it had insufficient information to accept our proposal," Adsteam CEO Clay Frederick said. The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) said Adsteam's refusal to accept the findings meant a planned 24-hour strike would now go ahead. MUA deckhands will stop work on Adsteam tugs in all New South Wales ports for 24 hours from midnight Wednesday.

Aircraft Carrier Hull Ready for Delivery

Photo: BAE Systems

A large section of HMS Prince of Wales has been loaded out of its dock hall in Portsmouth ready for delivery to Rosyth for final assembly of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier to begin. The 6,000-metric-ton section, called Lower Block 02, forms the distinctive forward hull section of HMS Prince of Wales and is comprised of cabins and machinery space. It was rolled out of the dock hall this morning using 2304 wheels guided by a single remote controlled. A transportation team will now secure the block to its barge ahead of departure next Tuesday around the east coast of the U.K.

HMS Queen Elizabeth Floats for the First Time

HMS Queen Elizabeth floats for the first time (Photo courtesy of BAE Systems)

The U.K.'s largest ever warship, HMS Queen Elizabeth, has today been floated out of the dock in which she was assembled. In an operation that started earlier this week, the drydock in Rosyth near Edinburgh was flooded for the first time to allow the 65,000-metric-ton aircraft carrier to float. It then took three hours this morning to carefully maneuver HMS Queen Elizabeth out of the dock with just two meters clearance at either side and then berth her alongside a nearby jetty.

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