Marine Link
Saturday, January 20, 2018

International Labour Organization News

Seafarers 'Bill of Rights' In Force Today

Photo credit IMO

Tuesday 20,  August 2013 is the date when the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) 2006, comes into force for ships flagged in those states that signed up to it exactly one year ago. More states have since signed the convention, and the MLC will take effect for them one year on from the date they signed. Currently, 47 member states of the International Labour Organization (ILO) have signed up to the MLC, representing more than 75 percent of the world’s gross tonnage of ships. •    health and safety protection, and accident prevention
, seafarers’ complaint handling.

Looking Beyond Maritime Security

Pic: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Economic stability and sustainable development can be driven by an integrated approach to the maritime sector, including ports, maritime security and facilitation of maritime traffic. Joined-up government policies covering the whole of the maritime sector are critical for the port sector to flourish. These were among key messages delivered by International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Chris Trelawny, who was speaking at the Port Security Technology conference, London, United Kingdom (20 June)…

Panama Ratifies Maritime Labour Convention

The Ambassador of the Republic of Panama, HE Mr. Juan Alberto Castillero, on Feb. 6 deposited the instrument of ratification of the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 with the International Labour Organization (ILO). Panama, the largest flag State in the world, with nearly 25 per cent of the world’s merchant fleet flying its flag, is the fourth major shipping country in the world to ratify the Convention, adopted by the 94th International Labour Conference (Maritime) in Geneva in February 2006. Panama’s ratification is especially significant because, combined with the ratifications by Liberia, the Republic of Marshall Islands and the Bahamas (the next three largest States).

ICS Stresses Importance of Treaty Ratification

Governments must not impede the smooth operation of a global maritime regulatory regime by failing to ratify and implement crucial maritime conventions, warns the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS). parts of the voyage, advises ICS - the principal international trade association for shipowners, representing 80% of the world merchant fleet. ICS and its sister organisation, the International Shipping Federation (ISF), have produced a campaign brochure (launched this week - attached) which reiterates the importance of maritime treaty ratification and which is intended to help member national shipowner associations lobby their governments to support the global regulatory system that shipping requires. "A global industry requires global rules." said ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe.

ILO Wants Lasting Solution to Migrant, Refugee Crisis

Migrants & Refugees issues need a durable solution

The Director-General of the International Labour Organization (ILO), Guy Ryder, has called for a definitive and durable solution for the thousands of migrant workers who risk their lives in a search of a decent future. “Stopgap measures to halt the flows of migrants only scratch the surface of the problem. We need to go deeper into the root causes that force people to put their lives in danger in order to find work and security in foreign lands,” said Ryder. The overcrowded boat…

CG Announces Crewmember ID Final Rule

The U.S. Coast Guard's Marine Safety, Security and Stewardship Directorate announced the publication of a final rule establishing new identification document requirements for crewmembers of certain vessels in U.S. navigable waters. This rule affects crewmembers aboard foreign commerical vessels operating in U.S. waters and calling on U.S. ports, and crewmembers aboard U.S. commercial vessels returning from a foreign port. The rule requires crewmembers to possess and provide on demand one of the following acceptable identification documents: a passport, a U.S. permanent resident card, a U.S. merchant mariner document, a U.S. merchant mariner credential…

Canada Unveils New Arctic Shipping Safety Regulations

Photo: Transport Canada

Canada's Arctic is a vast and diverse region that is an integral part of this country. Marine transportation in the Arctic connects Canada to other countries and provides an essential lifeline for northern communities. To uphold the Government of Canada's high standards for marine shipping in the north, Transport Canada has introduced new Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations. The regulations incorporate the International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (the Polar Code) into Canada's domestic legislation.

Protecting Captive Seafarers’ Wages

Pic: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

The issue of protecting captive seafarers' wages is on the agenda at an International Labour Organization (ILO) meeting in Geneva, Switzerland (3-5 April). IMO has taken part in the ILO Working Group of the Special Tripartite Committee, established under the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) – the international treaty covering minimum working and living standards for seafarers. The Group is considering proposals on the protection of a seafarer's wages when the seafarer is held captive, on or off the ship, as a result of acts such as piracy or armed robbery against ships.

Seafarer Protection to be Enhanced by New MLC Regulations

Maritime Labour Convention meeting: Photo DMA

At the 103rd International Labour Conference, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has, with a staggering majority, adopted new provisions on the protection of abandoned seafarers and seafarers who have been injured in occupational accidents, informs the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA). DMA explains that the new regulations are, inter alia, intended to ensure financial security when a seafarer is abandoned in a foreign port without any economic possibilities of paying the voyage home or is taken ill, for example as a consequence of an occupational accident.

IMO Welcomes Financial Security Obligations for Seafarers

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO) Secretary-General Kitack Lim has welcomed the entry into force today (18 January) of new obligations under the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC 2006) which require shipowners to have compulsory insurance to cover abandonment of seafarers, as well as claims for death or long-term disability of seafarers. The 2014 amendments to the MLC 2006, which comes under the auspices of the International Labour Organization (ILO), are based on guidelines which were developed by a joint IMO/ILO working group…

ILO Minimum Wage for Seafarers to Stay at $614

Photo:  International Chamber of Shipping

The recommended International Labour Organization (ILO) Minimum Wage for Able Seafarers will remain at its current level of US$ 614 basic pay per month until at least 2018. This follows an ILO Joint Maritime Commission (JMC) meeting held in Geneva last week, comprising representatives of maritime employers co-ordinated by the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and seafarers’ unions co-ordinated by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF). ICS, in its role as an official ILO social partner…

InterManager Welcomes New Protection for Seafarers

Captain Kuba Szymanski

InterManager said it welcomes the adoption of new measures to protect seafarers against abandonment. Amendments to the Maritime Labour Convention 2006, agreed at a meeting of the International Labour Organization in Geneva last week, will ensure the provision of financial security systems to assist seafarers in the event of their abandonment and for compensation for seafarers’ contractual claims for death and personal injury. InterManager Secretary General, Captain Kuba Szymanski, said: “InterManager welcomes this protection for seafarers.

Progress on SID Convention Weclomed by ICS

Joe Cox Photo ICS

The International Chamber of Shipping, as the Secretariat for the Shipowner Group at the International Labour Organization (ILO), co-ordinated employers’ representatives at the Ad Hoc Tripartite Maritime Committee on the Seafarers’ Identity Documents Convention (Revised), 2003 (No. 185), held in Geneva from 10 to 12 February 2016. ILO 185 requires ratifying nations to issue resident seafarers with Seafarers’ Identity Documents (SIDs), and to facilitate the entry of foreign seafarers holding such documents into their territory for the purposes of shore leave, transfer and transit.

Int’l Register of Shipping Appoints Nassif

International Register of Shipping (IRS), an independent classification society, appointed Said Nassif as managing director as incumbent Bijimon Punnoose is promoted to the management committee. This new promotion of Punnoose will now allow him to develop global strategy for IRS. Incorporated within this role will be business development for the Americas. The appointments take immediate effect. After his sea career, Nassif joined the Canadian government as a marine surveyor, rose through the ranks and held several management positions including Director Marine Security where he was responsible for the promotion and enforcement of policies, standards and regulations to improve security in the maritime sector.

Abandonment of Seafarers on Agenda

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Seafarer abandonment was the subject of a seminar held at  International Maritime Organization (IMO) Headquarters, London (22 June) – a joint IMO-Consular Corps of London event. Diplomats and consular officers involved in dealing with abandonment cases heard speakers provide a variety of perspectives on the subject, including on the legal framework, seafarer support, the representation of seafarers' interests, and the flag State perspective. Click for photos. In his opening remarks…

Ship Recycling Discussed at IMO

The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) considered the first draft of a proposed new international instrument on ship recycling when it met for its 54th session from 20-24 March. Other issues on the agenda included ballast water management and air pollution from ships. The Committee also adopted a number of amendments to the MARPOL Convention. The MEPC made progress in developing the draft text of a mandatory instrument providing globally-applicable ship recycling regulations for international shipping and for recycling activities. A Working Group on Ship Recycling met during the session to work on the draft text and discuss related issues.

ILO Moves on Seafarer Safety

The International Labour Organization (ILO) took a major step toward strengthening security measures on the high seas and in world ports by adopting a new "biometric" identity verification system for some 1.2 million maritime workers who handle 90 per cent of the world's trade. The new measure is essential for the implementation of the revised Seafarers' Identity Documents Convention, 2003 (No. 185) (Note 1), adopted by the International Labour Conference last June, and was approved today by the ILO Governing Body's 289th session. The new biometric standard is aimed at providing a more rigorous response to the need for increased security among seafarers in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States.

IMO Raises Seafarer Issues with US

IMO Secretary-General Efthimios Mitropoulos and US Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge met at IMO Headquarters on Friday, 14 January 2005 to discuss maritime security issues of mutual concern. During the meeting, Mr. Ridge expressed appreciation to IMO and its Member States for the rapid and comprehensive international response to maritime security issues following the September 2001 attacks in the United States, including the adoption of the special measures to enhance maritime security which entered into force on 1 July 2004 as part of the SOLAS Convention. Mr. Mitropoulos referred to work carried out by IMO in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO) on seafarer identification.

AMSA Bans Ship for 12 Months

Pic courtesy: AMSA

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) has banned a vessel from entering or using any port in Australia for 12 months, for the first time. AMSA issued a directive to Indonesian-flagged container ship Red Rover banning it from entering into any Australian port for a year after being detained three times since September 2014 for Safety Management System failures. The most recent detention was on 28 January 2015 in Fremantle, Western Australia. All three detentions identified failings in the vessel’s Safety Management System…

ICS Highlights Ocean Governance Issues at UN

Simon Bennett (Photo: ICS)

In New York today, April 7, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) represented global shipowners at a United Nations meeting, having been invited to speak as a panellist as part of the UN Inter Consultative Process on the Law of Sea. The opportunity was taken by ICS to highlight the extent to which shipping is very effectively regulated by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) in order to deliver the United Nations’ sustainable development goals.

Implementation of Standards On Board Ships Matters

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Once technical standards have been developed by IMO and adopted into national laws, the next step is implementation on board ships. This is the role of both flag States, who issue surveys and certificates, as well as port States, who can inspect all ships in their ports. The Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments, meeting this week for its fourth session (III 4, 25-29 September) provides a forum where all matters relating to implementation are discussed. This week’s agenda includes the finalization of revised and updated Procedures for Port State Control…

New Int’l Convention for Ship Recycling

A new international Convention on ship recycling has been adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009 is aimed at ensuring that ships, when being recycled after reaching the end of their operational lives, do not pose unnecessary risk to human health and safety or to the environment. The Convention was adopted at a diplomatic conference held in Hong Kong, China, from 11 to 15 May 2009, attended by delegates from 63 countries. The new Convention was developed by IMO, the United Nations specialized agency with responsibility for the safety and security of shipping and the prevention of marine pollution from ships.

Tsunami: IMO to Co-ordinate Maritime Restoration

As global attention in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami tragedy turns towards the massive job of repairing long-term damage and restoring battered infrastructures, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is playing its part in co-ordinating efforts to attend to the maritime infrastructure in the affected regions. IMO Secretary-General Efthimios E. Mitropoulos has stressed the strategic importance of ensuring that ports, navigational aids and other key elements of the maritime infrastructure are in effective working order as soon as possible, both to facilitate the medium and long-term recovery of the affected areas and to ensure that short-term aid arriving by sea can do so efficiently and in safety.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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