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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Lm2500 Gas News

GE Powers India’s First Aircraft Carrier

Indian Navy Aircraft Carrier (Photo: GE)

GE Marine, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, announced that four GE LM2500 gas turbines will soon power the Indian Navy’s INS Vikrant, providing 80 megawatts for the country’s first indigenous aircraft carrier. Similar to the INS Vikrant itself, the ship’s propulsion plant (four LM2500 gas turbine modules) were manufactured in India by Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.’s (HAL) Industrial & Marine Gas Turbine (IMGT) Division. Through its license with GE, HAL assembled, inspected and tested the LM2500 gas turbines and module enclosures for INS Vikrant.

GE Ships LM2500 Marine Gas Turbine for US Navy

GE LM2500 GT hanging angle shot (Photo: GE Marine)

GE's Marine Solutions division said it has shipped a LM2500 marine gas turbine propulsion module that will help power the U.S. Navy's 75th DDG Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). Shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries' Ingalls Shipbuilding division will construct this new destroyer with U.S. Navy Flight III upgrades incorporated. Each DDG destroyer features four GE LM2500 marine gas turbines in a combined gas turbine and gas turbine (COGAG) configuration. "Since 1991 - for just the U.S.

GE Gas Turbine to Power USCG Cutter

USCG Cutter James (Photo: GE Marine)

GE Marine reports that its LM2500 gas turbine will power the United States Coast Guard’s eighth National Security Cutter Midgett (WMSL 757). The ship will be powered by one GE LM2500 gas turbine and two diesel engines in a Combined Diesel And Gas turbine (CODAG) propulsion system. All eight ships in the U.S. Coast Guard’s Legend-class cutter program feature the same LM2500-based CODAG propulsion arrangement. Similar to its sister NSCs, Huntington Ingalls Industries' Ingalls Shipbuilding division will construct the 418-foot-long Midgett at its Pascagoula, Mississippi, shipyard.

GE Powers Polish Navy

GE Marine reports that its LM2500 gas turbine will be used to power the Polish Navy’s next generation Type 621 corvette, to be named Gawron. The LM2500 gas turbine will be applied in a combined diesel and gas turbine configuration, with two diesel engines. GE’s LM2500 gas turbine currently powers the Polish Navy’s Gen. K. Pulawski frigate. The gas turbine for the Gawron will be manufactured at GE Marine’s Evendale, Ohio facility. The LM2500 will be placed into a propulsion module by Avio of Torino, Italy. Avio, a GE partner, will also design and supply the LM2500 module electronic control system. The new corvette will be built by Poland’s Gdynia Shipyard, Warsaw, Poland. Installation of the gas turbine module is slated for June 2008.

GE Gas Turbines to Power Indian Stealth Frigate

LM2500 (GE Marine Solutions)

GE’s Marine Solutions announced that its LM2500 marine gas turbines will power the Indian Navy’s P17A stealth frigate. The LM2500 gas turbines will be provided by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) Industrial and Marine Gas Turbine division, Bangalore, India under license from GE. HAL will assemble and test the LM2500 gas turbines prior to installation; HAL is licensed by GE to do so for Indian Navy LM2500 propulsion applications. HAL also is licensed to provide service and comprehensive support including inspection…

Gas Turbines Continue Making Commercial Inroads

GE Marine Engines has been supplying integrated propulsion systems for a variety of commercial and military marine customers for more than 25 years. GE's complete line of aeroderivative gas turbines includes the LM500 (6,000 hp), LM1600 (20,000 hp), the LM2500 (33,600 hp), the LM2500+ (40,500 hp) and the LM6000 (57,330 hp). For instance, the first gas turbine-powered fast ferry in Greece entered service in the summer of 2001. This Corsaire 14000-class monohull is powered by two GE LM2500+ gas turbines in a combined diesel and gas turbine (CODAG) arrangement with two diesel engines. The ship was built for operator Maritime Company of Levos (NEL), Piraeus, Greece, by Alstom Leroux Naval Shipyard in France.

HAL Noordam Powered by GE LM2500 Gas Turbine

Marine announced that Holland America Line’s (HAL) Noordam cruise ship recently began operating powered by one LM2500 gas turbine-generator set in a COmbined Diesel And Gas turbine (CODAG) configuration. This brings the total to 17 cruise ships powered by GE gas turbines, the company reported at the Seatrade Cruise Shipping Conference. The Noordam’s maiden voyage was on February 22, 2006. Routes include destinations in the eastern Caribbean and Europe. The 950-foot long ship can carry 1,918 passengers and a crew of 800, with a maximum speed of 24 knots. The Noordam is the last of four ships in Holland American Line’s Vista class; the three other Vista-class ships – Zuiderdam, Oosterdam, and Westerdam – also are powered by GE LM2500 gas turbines in a CODAG configuration.

GE Supplies MTU with LM2500 Gas Turbine

Photo courtesy GE Marine

GE Marine reported that it will supply MTU, Friedrichshafen, Germany, with one LM2500 gas turbine to power the German Navy’s F125 frigate. MTU is a GE Marine System Supplier. The Baden-Wurttemberg class frigate will use a combined diesel electric and gas turbine (CODLAG) system featuring one LM2500 gas turbine and four MTU 20V 4000 M53B diesel engines and generators. The generators will produce a total of 12,060 kilowatts/16,400 horsepower for the ship’s on-board power supply system, and/or provide diesel-electric propulsion power for cruising speeds of up to 20 knots.

GE Marine Gas Turbines Selected for US Navy, Coast Guard

Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries

GE’s Marine Solutions said its LM2500 family of aeroderivative marine gas turbines have been selected to power two newbuild surface combatants for U.S. Navy and Coast Guard programs. Specifically, two LM2500+ gas turbines will power Bougainville (LHA 8), the U.S. Navy’s newest multi-purpose amphibious assault ship. Construction is expected to begin shortly according to shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries. GE LM2500+ gas turbines also power first-in-class USS America (LHA 6) and Tripoli (LHA 7).

GE Aeroderivative Marine Gas Turbines Log more than 320,000 Service Hours

GE announced that its fleet of 25 aeroderivative marine gas turbines has accumulated more than 320,000 hours operating aboard 16 cruise ships. GE remains the only gas turbine manufacturer to have its engines in service on cruise ships, the company reported today at the Seatrade Cruise Shipping Convention. "We are setting a new reliability standard in the cruise industry for propulsion and onboard power," said Karl Matson, general manager of GE Transportation's marine business, Evendale, Ohio. The GE gas turbines now in service are configured in two different types of arrangements: 16 LM2500+ gas turbines are the basis for a COmbined Gas turbine and steam turbine integrated Electric drive System (COGES) used aboard four Celebrity Cruises and four Royal Caribbean International cruise ships…

GE Gas Turbines to Power Spanish Navy Frigate

GE Marine will supply Navantia, A Coruña, Spain, with two LM2500 gas turbines that will power the Spanish Navy’s next-generation F105 frigate, to be named Roger de Lauria. Navantia is building the frigate at its Ferrol shipyard. The LM2500 gas turbines will be applied in a COmbined Diesel Or Gas turbine (CODOG) configuration, with two diesel engines onboard the Roger de Lauria frigate. The 479-ft. Roger de Lauria will have a maximum speed of 28.5 knots. The LM2500 gas turbines for the frigate will be manufactured at GE Marine’s Evendale, Ohio facility. Delivery of the gas turbines is slated for the summer of 2008; the ship will be commissioned in late December 2012.

GE and MTU Extend Marine System Supplier Agreement

The LM2500 gas turbine (Photo: GE).

Evendale, Ohio -- GE Marine reported that it will provide MTU Friedrichshafen with one LM2500 gas turbine for the German Navy’s third Baden-Württemberg-class (F125) frigate. “We are pleased to also announce that GE recently extended its Marine System Supplier agreement with MTU, a long-standing relationship which has been in place between the two companies since the early 1970s,” said Brien Bolsinger, GE Marine general manager. Under the MSS agreement, MTU buys GE Marine LM gas turbines and installs them into MTU packages for integration into complete propulsion systems.

GE Marine to Power LCS 4

GE Marine reports that its LM2500 gas turbines will be used to power the United States Navy’s next Littoral Combat Ship (LCS 4). GE will supply the two LM2500 gas turbine modules to Austal USA, Mobile, Alabama. Austal USA is a subcontractor to Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, a General Dynamics company and the prime contractor for the General Dynamics LCS program. “The Independence (LCS 2) -- also built by Austal USA/Bath Iron Works -- features two GE LM2500 gas turbines. The keel for this vessel was laid on January 19, 2006,” said Brien Bolsinger, GE Marine general manager. The General Dynamics trimaran LCS is an agile surface combatant that can be deployed independently to overseas littoral regions…

Acceptance Test on First LM2500 Gas Turbine for RAN

GE Marine reports that it has successfully completed acceptance testing on the first LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbine for the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD). GE will supply ASC, Adelaide, Australia -- the shipbuilder in the AWD Alliance -- with six LM2500 gas turbines to power three RAN advanced AWDs. Each Hobart class AWD will feature two LM2500s configured into a COmbined Diesel And Gas turbine arrangement with two diesel engines. The vessels will be built at ASC’s Osborne shipyard.

GE to Provide MTU with LM2500 Gas Turbine

An artist rendering of the F125 frigate

GE Marine reports that it will provide MTU Friedrichshafen, Friedrichshafen, Germany, with one LM2500 gas turbine for the German Navy’s fourth Baden-Württemberg-class (F125) frigate. For each new F125 frigate, MTU will provide the German Navy with one LM2500 gas turbine, two electric motors and four diesel generator-sets in combined diesel-electric and gas turbine propulsion arrangement. The keel for the first F125 frigate was laid in November 2011 at the Blohm +Voss shipyard in Hamburg.

LM2500 Gas Turbine Powers Turkish Navy's MILGEM Corvette

GE LM2500-based propulsion system  Photo GE’s Marine Solutions

GE’s Marine Solutions announced that the Turkish Navy’s third MILGEM multi-purpose corvette TCG Burgazada was launched powered by a GE LM2500 gas turbine-based propulsion system. The launch ceremony was held in mid-June at the Istanbul Naval Shipyard; a keel laying ceremony was also held for sister MILGEM ship TCG Kınalıada. The propulsion system for TCG Burgazada (F-513) is the same as sisters TCG Heybeliada (F-511) and TCG Büyükada (F-512), consisting of an LM2500 gas turbine in a combined diesel and gas turbine configuration with two diesel engines.

GE to Supply Gas Turbines to Australian Navy

GE Marine will supply ASC Shipbuilding, Adelaide, Australia, with six LM2500 gas turbines to power three Royal Australian Navy (RAN) advanced Air Warfare Destroyers (AWD). Each Hobart class AWD will feature two LM2500s configured into a Combined Diesel and Gas turbine (CODAG) arrangement with two diesel engines. The vessels will be built at the ASC’s Osborne shipyard. The RAN’s new destroyers will use the same design developed by Navantia of Spain and used for the Spanish Navy’s F100 frigate program.

GE Tapped to Power Japanese Destroyer

GE Marine will supply Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd. (IHI), Tokyo, Japan with four LM2500 gas turbines. The engines will be placed into propulsion modules by IHI to power the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF) 15DDG AEGIS destroyer. The destroyer will be built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.’s Nagasaki, Japan shipyard. The 15DDG will be the sixth AEGIS destroyer built for the JMSDF using GE’s LM2500 gas turbines. In fact, this order brings the total of LM2500s in the JMSDF’s fleet to 61, including Murasame-class and Takanami-class destroyers that are powered by this gas turbine. In addition, 27 GE LM500 gas turbines power six JMSDF hydrofoils and three monohull boats.

GE Gas Turbines to Power US Navy’s New Destroyers

DDG destroyer (Photo: GE Marine)

The U.S. Navy’s new DDG 121 and DDG 122 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers will be powered by eight LM2500 marine gas turbines supplied by GE Marine, who also received a five-year extension on its requirements contract for the DDG 51 program. “Once operational, these Arleigh Burke-class destroyers will be in service for some 30 years. GE Marine will be there alongside the U.S. Navy for the life of this program, providing support of the LM2500 gas turbines through continual infusion of advanced technologies,” said Brien Bolsinger, Vice President, Marine Operations, GE Marine, Evendale, Ohio.

GE Marine Engines Extends MSS Agreement with MTU

GE Marine Engines announced it has extended its Marine System Supplier (MSS) agreement with MTU Friedrichshafen (MTU), covering MTU's packaging and distribution of GE LM marine aeroderivative gas turbines. "Our successful MSS agreement with MTU dates back to the 1970s," said Karl Matson, general manager of GE Marine Engines. "This relationship has made it possible for our LM1600, LM2500 and LM2500+ gas turbines to be used alone or in combination with MTU diesel engines from their full line of diesel engines. GE LM gas turbines cover the power range from 4,500 kilowatts (kW) to 42,700 kW. To date, MTU has packaged several GE LM gas turbines for commercial fast ferries and military vessels.

GE Provides LM2500 Gas Turbine Modules for U.S. Navy

GE Marine reports that its LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbines will be used to power the United States Navy’s new Flight IIA Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. GE has received orders for the initial three of an expected nine new Flight IIA ships. The new destroyers are being built as part of the U.S. Navy’s DDG 51 program. “The successful DDG 51 program already includes 57 destroyers delivered, with five additional ships under construction, all powered by GE LM2500 gas turbines. The U.S. Navy has been pleased with the performance and reliability of our engines on the Arleigh Burke class ships, as well as on the Ticonderoga class cruisers and Perry class frigates. Mean time between removal of the LM2500 gas turbines is roughly 23,000 hours, which equates to about 17 years in service.

GE Gas Turbines Power USS America

Image courtesy GE Marine

GE Marine reports that the United States Navy’s future USS America (LHA 6) amphibious assault ship recently completed successful acceptance sea trials powered by two GE LM2500+ marine gas turbines. Acceptance sea trials were conducted in the Gulf of Mexico by Huntington Ingalls Industries, nearby its Pascagoula, Mississippi, shipyard. “The selection of the LM2500+ gas turbines offers propulsion commonality for this first-in-class ship with the U.S. Navy’s USS Makin Island LHD 8 amphibious assault ship. The LHD 8 was the first U.S.

First LM2500-Powered Ship for Indian Navy

Photo courtesy of the Indian Navy

GE Marine reports that the Indian Navy commissioned the INS Shivalik stealth frigate on April 29, 2010, at the Indian Navy’s shipyard in Mumbai. This first-in-class frigate, built by Mazagon Dock Ltd. (MDL), is powered by two GE LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbines with two diesels in a combined diesel or gas turbine (CODOG) configuration. This project marks the first LM2500-powered ship to enter service with the Indian Navy. The 4,600-ton INS Shivalik measures 469 ft in length with a beam of 55.7 ft.

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