Marine Link
Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Radiation News

Port of Antwerp Gets Nuke Detectors

Photo courtesy of Port of Antwerp

Arktis Radiation Detectors was selected to supply radiation portal monitors and mobile detection systems to the Belgian Government, for use at the Port of Antwerp. Under the contract, which has been let by the Belgium Ministry of Finance, Arktis and partner Bavak - Arktis’ exclusive distributor for the Benelux Region - will supply the port with radiation detection equipment for the largest capacity container terminal in Europe, located at the Left Bank in the Port of Antwerp.

US Ports See Improved Radiation Detecting

Radiation portal monitors like these alarm less frequently on cargo materials such as tile or granite that may contain nonthreatening, naturally occurring radioisotopes thanks to a new approach developed by PNNL, which emphasizes the use of selective energy-sensitive algorithms. (Photo: PNNL)

Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is improving radiation scanning equipment used at many of our nation's ports of entry. Radiation portal monitors (RPM) now better detect radiological threats while alarming much less frequently on nonthreatening materials, resulting in big savings. The improvements, known as Revised Operational Settings (ROS), are being implemented during the annual calibrations of radiation portal monitors used to detect radiological threats in cargo and conveyances entering the U.S. through official ports of entry.

DHS Announces West Coast Maritime Radiation Detection Project

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) announced the West Coast Maritime pilot program that will provide maritime radiation detection capabilities for State and local authorities in Washington’s Puget Sound and California’s San Diego areas. The three-year pilot program involves the development of a radiation detection architecture that reduces the risk of radiological and nuclear threats that could be illegally transported on recreational or small commercial vessels. The pilot will be conducted in close coordination with the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection. DNDO anticipates investing roughly $10 million in the pilot program.

Canada Port Gets First Radiation Detector

Federal officials have installed Canada's first radiation detector at the port of Saint John in New Brunswick in a bid to protect the country against nuclear terrorism, the Canadian Press reports. While Saint John, N.B., is the first port to get the nuclear detection devices, all major Canadian ports soon will be equipped with the anti-terrorism technology. The radiation detection program is a key part of Ottawa's $172-million plan to beef up marine security - all stemming from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The devices, which have been in use for two weeks in Saint John, detect radiation inside containers. The detector is located on two large concrete columns. The containers are driven through the scanning portal after they have been loaded on trucks. Source: Canadian Press

Canada Port Gets First Radiation Detector

Federal officials have installed Canada's first radiation detector at the port of Saint John in New Brunswick in a bid to protect the country against nuclear terrorism, the Canadian Press reports. While Saint John, N.B., is the first port to get the nuclear detection devices, all major Canadian ports soon will be equipped with the anti-terrorism technology. The radiation detection program is a key part of Ottawa's $172-million plan to beef up marine security - all stemming from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The devices, which have been in use for two weeks in Saint John, detect radiation inside containers. The detector is located on two large concrete columns. The containers are driven through the scanning portal after they have been loaded on trucks.

Radioactive Ocean Website Garners Support

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has teamed up with the public to build the most comprehensive and up-to-date dataset on marine radiation levels in the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. With no U.S. government or international plan to monitor the radiation levels in the ocean since the disaster, WHOI marine chemist Ken Buesseler launched a crowdsourcing campaign and citizen science website to include and empower the public. He is posting all of the current radiation level data online. “Whether you agree with predictions that levels of radiation along the Pacific Coast of North America will be too low to be of human health concern or to impact fisheries and marine life…

GEA BallastMaster Is Awarded IMO Approval

A new solution of GEA Westfalia Separator Group for the treatment of ballast water with the aid of ultraviolet radiation, the BallastMaster ultraV, was certified in accordance with IMO guidelines and regulations. The BallastMaster ultraV ballast water management system is a mechanical/physical system solution for treating ballast water, including that with a high concentration of organisms and sedimentary particles. The two-stage system works with mechanical pre-filtration and subsequent disinfecting of the ballast water by UV-C and ultrasonic radiation without the use or generation of chemicals. In the first stage, an upstream mechanical filtration system removes all organisms and sedimentary particles larger than 20 microns.

MOL Receives Permission to Call at Hong Kong

ROTTERDAM, 8 April 2011 – Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL; President: Koichi Muto) today reported that the MOL-operated containership MOL PRESENCE arrived in Hong Kong, and received permission to call at the port at 14:00 JST on Friday, April 8 (local time: 13:00), 2011. On March 22, the company received a report alleging higher than normal radiation had been detected on the MOL PRESENCE during quarantine inspection at Xiamen Port in Fujian Province, PRC. However, on-site inspection by a third party was not approved, so the MOL PRESENCE departed Xiamen on March 27, and was again inspected by Nippon Kaiji Kentei Kyokai off Kobe Port on March 30. Subsequent to that inspection, MOL received a report that the detected radiation level was significantly lower than the level detected in Xiamen.

First post-quake cargo cleared in U.S.

LOS ANGELES, MARCH 24, 2011: U.S. Customs and Border Protection gave global shipping line APL an all-clear here this week for the first shipment of containerized cargo from post-earthquake Japan. According to Customs, technicians conducted radiation tests on 355 containers discharged at the Port of Los Angeles from the vessel APL Korea. All containers were cleared for delivery to locations throughout the U.S. It was the first test of Japanese exports since a March 11 earthquake in Japan damaged nuclear reactors and raised radiation exposure concerns.

Radiation Portal Monitors Sought for U.S. Ports

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a Letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security

Rotterdam Trials Radiation Detection Equipment

February 10, tests with four radiation detection gates started at the Delta terminals at Maasvlakte. The four can handle check some one million containers per year. The tests are technical as well as aimed at minimizing the impact on logistic operations and will last into April. If successful a plan will be drawn up to install a few dozen of gates at the vital locations in the port area.

BallastMaster ultraV USCG Certified

The BallastMaster ultraV provides efficient treatment of ballast water by means of filtration and UV-C radiation and is available with capacities of 250 or 500 cubic meters per hour.

The BallastMaster ultraV developed by GEA Westfalia Separator Group for treating ballast water has been awarded the "Alternate Management System" (AMS) certificate. The approval was awarded by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) on November 11, 2013 and is considered to be the standard for the international recognition and selection of suppliers of ballast water processing installations. The AMS certificate is considered by the USCG to be a transitional measure until the type approval process has been formally implemented in American legislation.

Shipping Disruptions: Japan Battles Back

Eng Aik Meng, APL president

Japan is waging a public relations war as it struggles to control the nuclear contamination threat at home while playing down the concerns of consumers abroad. Fears of tainted goods from the battered nation are affecting trade flows, with regional weather distributing radiation particles and hysteria across Asia. In South Korea, panic over radioactive rain in March saw schools shut down en masse, despite the minute level of radiation posing no known health risks. In Hong Kong in April…

WHOI Scans Ocean for Fukushima Radiation

Image: WHOI

With concern among the public over the plume of radioactive ocean water from Fukushima arriving on the West Coast of North America and no U.S. government or international plan to monitor it, a new project from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is filling a timely information gap. Just two weeks after launching the crowd sourcing campaign and citizen science website, “How Radioactive Is Our Ocean,” WHOI marine chemist Ken Buesseler’s project has received more than 70 individual donations from the concerned public.

Hearing on Detecting Nuclear Weapons

The Subcommittees on Prevention of Nuclear and Biological Attack and on Emergency Preparedness, Science, and Technology of the House Committee on Homeland Security conducted a hearing on detecting nuclear weapons and radiological materials. Mr. Vayl Oxford, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, Department of Homeland Security, testified regarding current nuclear detection equipment and regarding equipment under development. Mr. Gene Aloise, Government Accountability Office (GAO), testified regarding problems in coordinating nuclear detection programs among the various agencies and regarding the effectiveness of radiation equipment currently deployed. Ms.

Maritime Authority of Jamaica: Fukushima 50 Mile Exclusion Zone

Concerns over the potential spread of radiation contamination in Japan have led to the Maritime Authority of Jamaica issuing a warning for operators of all Jamaican flag vessels to maintain a distance of at least 50 miles from the Fukushima nuclear facility. With the cooling systems not yet operating, unfavourable weather conditions anticipated and the head of the UN nuclear watchdog saying the situation "remains very serious,”  vessels are being urged to avoid all Japanese ports that fall within this 50 mile zone. Rear Admiral Peter Brady, Director General of the Maritime Authority of Jamaica says, ”We are recommending this action to protect the welfare of our crews and the integrity of cargo and vessels.

DP World Invests $300M in Port Security

Dubai Ports World (DP World), the world's third-largest port operator, is investing around $300m in port security, local newspaper Gulf News reported recently. The money will be used to secure 42 terminals worldwide, according to DP World's director of security David Fairnie. DP World has commissioned a three-tier foolproof container security initiative that involves X-ray, radiation and Optical Container Recognition (OCR), according to Fairnie. These can detect any radiation being emitted from the container, while the OCR captures container data and manages the supply chain. The company has also employed closed-circuit television (CCTV), alarm systems as well as anti-invasion systems across all its ports and terminal facilities.

DHS Awards $113min Port Security Deals

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office on awarded $113m in contracts to five companies for human portable radiation detection systems for use at the nation's ports. Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems (HPRDS) program contracts will be awarded to Ametec AMT of Oak Ridge, Tenn., Science Application International Corporation of San Diego Calif., Sanmina-SCI of Huntsville, Ala., Target Instruments, Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Smiths Detection Inc. of Pine Brook, N.J. DNDO anticipates purchasing and deploying roughly 1,000 next generation handheld systems and 200 backpack systems through the HPRDS program. The portable technology will be used primarily by U.S.

Fukushima Radioactivity In Tuna off Oregon, Washington

albacore tuna

A sample of albacore tuna caught off the shores of Oregon and Washington state have small levels of radioactivity from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, researchers said on Tuesday. But authors of the Oregon State University study say the levels are so small you would have to consume more than 700,000 pounds of the fish with the highest radioactive level to match the amount of radiation the average person is annually exposed to in everyday life through cosmic rays, the air, the ground, X-rays and other sources.

U.S. Navy Repositions Ships Off Japan, Contamination Detected

Photo courtesy US Navy

The U.S. 7th Fleet has temporarily repositioned its ships and aircraft away from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant after detecting low level contamination in the air and on its aircraft operating in the area. The source of this airborne radioactivity is a radioactive plume released from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant. For perspective, the maximum potential radiation dose received by any ship's force personnel aboard the ship when it passed through the area…

LVDT Linear Position Sensors Perform in Hostile Environments

LVDT Linear Position Sensors Available in Different Housings to Perform in Hostile Chemical, Radiation and Seawater Environments. Macro Sensors (www.macrosensors.com) offers its AC-operated LVDTs in different material housings to perform in varying operating environments including those with high and low temperature extremes, radiation exposure, seawater and vacuum pressure conditions. Standard configurations of Macro Sensors’ AC-operated linear position sensors are constructed…

Scotland Beach Radium Clean-up: UK MOD to Pay Up

Dalgety Beach background: Photo credit Gordon Brown Photo

Former UK Prime Minister and local MP Gordon Brown says that he welcomes the Ministry of Defence (MOD) agreement to pay costs of the radium contamination clean up of Dalgety Bay and estimates it will cost 10 million pounds. The pollution resulted from dumping 800 WWll wartime planes with radiated dials and other hazardous equipment, and subsequent coastal erosion that has brought the pollution to the surface. A town meeting of Dalgety Bay community has been called for July 21st by the Community Council.

GEA Westfalia Separator BallastMaster ultraV USCG Certified

The GEA Westfalia Separator BallastMaster ultraV provides efficient treatment of ballast water by means of filtration and UV C radiation and is available with capacities of 250 or 500 cubic meters per hour.

The BallastMaster ultraV developed by GEA Westfalia Separator for ballast water treatment has been awarded the "Alternate Management System" (AMS) certificate. The approval was awarded by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) on November 11, 2013. AMS is considered the standard for selection of suppliers for ballast water processing installations. The certificate is considered by the USCG to be a transitional measure until the type approval process has been formally implemented in American legislation. It follows the 2011 type approval of this unit in accordance with IMO.

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