Marine Link
Saturday, June 23, 2018

Radiation News

The 5% Myth

U.S. Customes and Border Protection issues a release to try and dispel what it calls common myths regarding container inspection. 95-percent of the containers that come into the ports are not inspected. · The 95-percent figure is misleading and falsely implies that we do nothing to inspect cargo containers arriving at our seaports. We use intelligence to review information on 100 % of cargo entering our ports, and all cargo that presents a risk to our country is inspected using large x-ray and radiation detection equipment. · Following 9/11, the Administration developed and implemented a smarter strategy to identify, target, and inspect cargo containers before they reach U.S. ports.

First post-quake cargo cleared in U.S.

LOS ANGELES, MARCH 24, 2011: U.S. Customs and Border Protection gave global shipping line APL an all-clear here this week for the first shipment of containerized cargo from post-earthquake Japan. According to Customs, technicians conducted radiation tests on 355 containers discharged at the Port of Los Angeles from the vessel APL Korea. All containers were cleared for delivery to locations throughout the U.S. It was the first test of Japanese exports since a March 11 earthquake in Japan damaged nuclear reactors and raised radiation exposure concerns.

Ship Rejected in China on Radiation

According to a report from Bloomberg, a ship that had “abnormal” amounts of radiation after passing 67 nautical miles off Japan’s Fukushima prefecture, site of a crippled nuclear-power station, was heading back to the country after being rejected by authorities in China. The MOL Presence was due to arrive in Kobe on March 30 from Xiamen, according to AISLive Ltd. ship-tracking data on Bloomberg.    (Source: Bloomberg)

MOL Receives Permission to Call at Hong Kong

ROTTERDAM, 8 April 2011 – Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL; President: Koichi Muto) today reported that the MOL-operated containership MOL PRESENCE arrived in Hong Kong, and received permission to call at the port at 14:00 JST on Friday, April 8 (local time: 13:00), 2011. On March 22, the company received a report alleging higher than normal radiation had been detected on the MOL PRESENCE during quarantine inspection at Xiamen Port in Fujian Province, PRC. However, on-site inspection by a third party was not approved, so the MOL PRESENCE departed Xiamen on March 27, and was again inspected by Nippon Kaiji Kentei Kyokai off Kobe Port on March 30. Subsequent to that inspection, MOL received a report that the detected radiation level was significantly lower than the level detected in Xiamen.

JNPT Gets Radiological Detection Equipment at Exit Gates

Photo: Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust

The Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT) in Mumbai has become the first major port in the country to install radiological detection equipment (RDE) at all its exit road and rail gates. An official press release said the Marine Department of the port had taken up the project and the work was awarded to the public sector Electronic Corporation of India (ECIL) in 2012 at a total cost of Rs. 23.324 crore. Twenty-eight  Vehicle Monitor Systems have been installed at the Road, Rail, Exit Gates.

Shipping Disruptions: Japan Battles Back

Eng Aik Meng, APL president

Japan is waging a public relations war as it struggles to control the nuclear contamination threat at home while playing down the concerns of consumers abroad. Fears of tainted goods from the battered nation are affecting trade flows, with regional weather distributing radiation particles and hysteria across Asia. In South Korea, panic over radioactive rain in March saw schools shut down en masse, despite the minute level of radiation posing no known health risks. In Hong Kong in April…

Scotland Beach Radium Clean-up: UK MOD to Pay Up

Dalgety Beach background: Photo credit Gordon Brown Photo

Former UK Prime Minister and local MP Gordon Brown says that he welcomes the Ministry of Defence (MOD) agreement to pay costs of the radium contamination clean up of Dalgety Bay and estimates it will cost 10 million pounds. The pollution resulted from dumping 800 WWll wartime planes with radiated dials and other hazardous equipment, and subsequent coastal erosion that has brought the pollution to the surface. A town meeting of Dalgety Bay community has been called for July 21st by the Community Council.

Contamination Controlled

Rear Adm. T. K. Shannon (left) and Rear Adm. Mark Buzby congratulate each other during a change of command ceremony aboard the USNS Spearhead (JSHV 1). Shannon relieved Buzby as commander, Military Sealift Command.  (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jesse A. Hyatt)

Rear Admiral Mark “Buz” Buzby, commander of the Military Sealift Command, sat with Maritime Reporter contributing editor Edward Lundquist talked with a week before his retirement aboard USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) at Little Creek, Virginia, on May 10, 2013. The talk centered on a unique event in maritime history. MSC had seven ships in the area east of Japan, responding to the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami that killed 19,000 people. One of them was the fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10)…

Radiation Portal Monitors Sought for U.S. Ports

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a Letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security

Rotterdam Trials Radiation Detection Equipment

February 10, tests with four radiation detection gates started at the Delta terminals at Maasvlakte. The four can handle check some one million containers per year. The tests are technical as well as aimed at minimizing the impact on logistic operations and will last into April. If successful a plan will be drawn up to install a few dozen of gates at the vital locations in the port area.

Canada Port Gets First Radiation Detector

Federal officials have installed Canada's first radiation detector at the port of Saint John in New Brunswick in a bid to protect the country against nuclear terrorism, the Canadian Press reports. While Saint John, N.B., is the first port to get the nuclear detection devices, all major Canadian ports soon will be equipped with the anti-terrorism technology. The radiation detection program is a key part of Ottawa's $172-million plan to beef up marine security - all stemming from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The devices, which have been in use for two weeks in Saint John, detect radiation inside containers. The detector is located on two large concrete columns. The containers are driven through the scanning portal after they have been loaded on trucks. Source: Canadian Press

Canada Port Gets First Radiation Detector

Federal officials have installed Canada's first radiation detector at the port of Saint John in New Brunswick in a bid to protect the country against nuclear terrorism, the Canadian Press reports. While Saint John, N.B., is the first port to get the nuclear detection devices, all major Canadian ports soon will be equipped with the anti-terrorism technology. The radiation detection program is a key part of Ottawa's $172-million plan to beef up marine security - all stemming from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The devices, which have been in use for two weeks in Saint John, detect radiation inside containers. The detector is located on two large concrete columns. The containers are driven through the scanning portal after they have been loaded on trucks.

GEA BallastMaster Is Awarded IMO Approval

A new solution of GEA Westfalia Separator Group for the treatment of ballast water with the aid of ultraviolet radiation, the BallastMaster ultraV, was certified in accordance with IMO guidelines and regulations. The BallastMaster ultraV ballast water management system is a mechanical/physical system solution for treating ballast water, including that with a high concentration of organisms and sedimentary particles. The two-stage system works with mechanical pre-filtration and subsequent disinfecting of the ballast water by UV-C and ultrasonic radiation without the use or generation of chemicals. In the first stage, an upstream mechanical filtration system removes all organisms and sedimentary particles larger than 20 microns.

BallastMaster ultraV USCG Certified

The BallastMaster ultraV provides efficient treatment of ballast water by means of filtration and UV-C radiation and is available with capacities of 250 or 500 cubic meters per hour.

The BallastMaster ultraV developed by GEA Westfalia Separator Group for treating ballast water has been awarded the "Alternate Management System" (AMS) certificate. The approval was awarded by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) on November 11, 2013 and is considered to be the standard for the international recognition and selection of suppliers of ballast water processing installations. The AMS certificate is considered by the USCG to be a transitional measure until the type approval process has been formally implemented in American legislation.

Ports to Get Radiation Detectors

The Department of Homeland Security, under a program called the Advanced Spectroscopic Portal Initiative, recently announced the award of contracts to three companies- Raytheon Company – Integrated Defense Systems, Thermo Electron Corporation, and Canberra Industries, Inc.- to install advanced radiation detector systems in some U.S. ports. The first test installation is slated to be in the Port of Staten Island. These contracts come after months of debate and argument over the issue of limited ability to inspect more than 5 percent of all cargo containers entering the country. According to ThreatsWatch.org, the fear in this matter is that dangerous contraband such as a radiological dirty bomb or a chemical-biological weapon might enter through the ports undetected.

WHOI Scans Ocean for Fukushima Radiation

Image: WHOI

With concern among the public over the plume of radioactive ocean water from Fukushima arriving on the West Coast of North America and no U.S. government or international plan to monitor it, a new project from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is filling a timely information gap. Just two weeks after launching the crowd sourcing campaign and citizen science website, “How Radioactive Is Our Ocean,” WHOI marine chemist Ken Buesseler’s project has received more than 70 individual donations from the concerned public.

Port of Antwerp Gets Nuke Detectors

Photo courtesy of Port of Antwerp

Arktis Radiation Detectors was selected to supply radiation portal monitors and mobile detection systems to the Belgian Government, for use at the Port of Antwerp. Under the contract, which has been let by the Belgium Ministry of Finance, Arktis and partner Bavak - Arktis’ exclusive distributor for the Benelux Region - will supply the port with radiation detection equipment for the largest capacity container terminal in Europe, located at the Left Bank in the Port of Antwerp.

Radioactive Ocean Website Garners Support

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has teamed up with the public to build the most comprehensive and up-to-date dataset on marine radiation levels in the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. With no U.S. government or international plan to monitor the radiation levels in the ocean since the disaster, WHOI marine chemist Ken Buesseler launched a crowdsourcing campaign and citizen science website to include and empower the public. He is posting all of the current radiation level data online. “Whether you agree with predictions that levels of radiation along the Pacific Coast of North America will be too low to be of human health concern or to impact fisheries and marine life…

Retlif Expands Solar Testing Capabilities

Environmental Chamber with Roof Mounted UV Lamps and Control-Monitoring Equipment(Photo: Retlif Testing Laboratories)

Independent testing and strategic compliance organization Retlif Testing Laboratories has inaugurated phase one of an expansion program to offer more solar radiation testing, including both heat and photochemical testing, to military and commercial product manufacturers. The first of two planned dedicated Solar Radiation Test Chamber upgrades has been completed at Retlif’s Harleysville, Pa. testing laboratory, with phase two scheduled for third quarter 2018 at Retlif’s Ronkonkoma, N.Y. headquarters.

DHS Announces West Coast Maritime Radiation Detection Project

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) announced the West Coast Maritime pilot program that will provide maritime radiation detection capabilities for State and local authorities in Washington’s Puget Sound and California’s San Diego areas. The three-year pilot program involves the development of a radiation detection architecture that reduces the risk of radiological and nuclear threats that could be illegally transported on recreational or small commercial vessels. The pilot will be conducted in close coordination with the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection. DNDO anticipates investing roughly $10 million in the pilot program.

San Francisco Orders a New Fire Boat

(Image: Moose Boats)

California boat builder Moose Boats said it was awarded a contract from the San Francisco Fire Department for the construction of a M2-38 Catamaran CBRN, Dive and Fire Rescue vessel to enter service in the third quarter of 2018. The aluminum catamaran, which is 75 percent funded by FEMA’s FY2015 Port Security Grant Program, will be powered by twin Cummins QSB6.7 425hp turbo diesel propulsion engines with Hamilton HJ292 waterjets. Serving primarily as a dive and rescue boat, the vessel will be outfitted with an integrated dive/recovery platform and a bow ladder for beach rescues.

Radiation Monitors Debut in LA

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Robert C. Bonner unveiled the first Radiation Portal Monitors now operational at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The event was part of a seaport security summit designed to acquaint port officials and the public with the pivotal role played by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in safeguarding the nation’s busiest seaport. “When it comes to the continued vibrancy of the United States economy, it is safe to say that as the ports of LA and Long Beach go, so goes the nation,” Commissioner Bonner stated. The recent recommendations that Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Michael Chertoff announced on July 13, called for “better systems to move people and goods more securely”.

US Ports See Improved Radiation Detecting

Radiation portal monitors like these alarm less frequently on cargo materials such as tile or granite that may contain nonthreatening, naturally occurring radioisotopes thanks to a new approach developed by PNNL, which emphasizes the use of selective energy-sensitive algorithms. (Photo: PNNL)

Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is improving radiation scanning equipment used at many of our nation's ports of entry. Radiation portal monitors (RPM) now better detect radiological threats while alarming much less frequently on nonthreatening materials, resulting in big savings. The improvements, known as Revised Operational Settings (ROS), are being implemented during the annual calibrations of radiation portal monitors used to detect radiological threats in cargo and conveyances entering the U.S. through official ports of entry.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

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